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Board of Education

  • BOE Continues To Look At 2015-16 Budget

    At its second workshop for the 2015-16 budget, on Thursday, January 8, the Board of Education continued to hear from school district leaders regarding individual aspects of the superintendent’s proposed spending plan.

    The workshop came after Superintendent of Schools Joseph V. Erardi, Jr, presented his proposed budget to the school board on Tuesday, January 6.

  • Superintendent Presents Proposed 2015-16 Budget

    Superintendent of Schools Joseph V. Erardi, Jr, presented a $72,399,186, proposed operating budget, a 1.48 percent increase over this year’s budget, to the Board of Education on Tuesday, January 6.

  • Year In Review: Transitions Changed The Face Of Newtown’s School Administration In 2014

    The lineup of Newtown’s administrative team changed in 2014.

    At the start of the year, the Board of Education was conducting a search for a new superintendent of schools. On January 10, five members of the school board were ready to head to Southington to conduct a site visit with that district’s then-superintendent, Joseph V. Erardi, Jr.

    The visit was part of the interview process, as BOE Vice Chair Laura Roche told The Bee.

  • BOE Hears NICE Report And Songs From Hawley Third Graders

    During a report from Newtown International Center for Education (NICE) Executive Council members, the Board of Education learned of a new strategic plan for the program at its meeting on December 16.

    NICE Executive Council members Tim DeJulio, Liz Ward-Toller, and Jen Davidson explained goals and objectives for the program along with presenting the strategic plan.

  • School Board Hears Report On Expected Enrollment Decline

    An enrollment report was presented to the Board of Education on November 5 confirming the expected decline in student populations over the next decade.

    Each of the three projection models reported an enrollment decrease over the next ten years, ranging from roughly 28 percent to 17 percent, based on local economic and other conditions.

    Milone & MacBroom representatives Rebecca Augur and Michael Zuba, a principal planner, presented the enrollment report Wednesday evening.

  • School Board Hears Pitch For More NHS Sports

    Newtown High School Principal Lorrie Rodrigue and Athletic Director Gregg Simon promoted the benefits of athletics and shared a vision for the future of sports at NHS with the Board of Education during its meeting on October 21.

    “If you have been to a sports event as an educator or a parent or, of course, as a community member, you really realize how truly lucky we are of the tremendous support that is shown on behalf of our students throughout the year,” said Dr Rodrigue.

  • School Board Changes Its Plan For NHS Auditorium Project

    After reviewing new information, the Board of Education, during its meeting on October 21, voted to change its previously approved plans for a proposed Newtown High School auditorium renovation.

    During its meeting on October 7, the school board voted to request a special appropriation for the project, and authorized the Public Building & Site Commission to have oversight of the renovation.

  • School Board Honors Ashley Gong

    Continuing its practice of highlighting excellence, the Board of Education honored Newtown High School junior Ashley Gong at its meeting on Tuesday, October 7.

  • Phase 4: School Board Approves SHS Construction Documents

    The Board of Education approved on Tuesday, October 7, the fourth phase of the Sandy Hook School building construction project to be forwarded to the state.

    Previously, at its September 16 meeting, the school board heard a presentation from Diversified Project Management’s Geralyn Hoerauf, Consigli Construction’s Aaron Krueger, and Svigals + Partners’ Julie McFadden, who each reported on the progress of the Sandy Hook School building project. Phase 4 of the project will focus on building construction.

  • Failing An FOI Pop Quiz

    Connecticut’s Freedom of Information Act has been on the books for nearly 40 years. A couple of generations of public servants have been operating under its provisions. Yet after decades of illumination by the state’s Sunshine Laws, our elected and appointed representatives in government continue to wander into the shadows, where they stumble over provisions of the act that should be well known to everyone by now.