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  • Bullying: A Problem Behavior That Spans Generations

    In a population of more than 320,000,000 people, US Census statistics show that 40.3 million are people 65 years of age and older. Of those, according to the National Center for Assisted Living, more than 735,000 men and women live in assisted living situations. Approximately 1.3 million more are housed in nursing homes.Within the walls of residences, homes, and anywhere large numbers of senior citizens gather, a pecking order plays out. At its best, it allows leaders to lead. At its worst, it is bullying, no different than that seen in adolescent circles. Unless witnesses speak up or managers intervene, bullying is a behavior that can compound the sometimes already fragile mental and physical health of others. People live longer, and the number of senior citizens living in congregate housing has increased greatly since the 1980s, said Donna Fedus, MA, gerontologist, founder of eldercare resource Borrow My Glasses, and director of elder programs at The Consultation Center, Yale University School of Medicine.

  • P&Z Approves Apartments For Veterinary Students

    Following review, Planning and Zoning Commission members have approved a request from Fairfield Equine Associates to expand the terms of its existing special permit to allow the firm to create two more apartments for veterinary students at its 32 Barnabas Road facility in Hawleyville. Nancy Stevens, representing Fairfield Equine, presented the apartment proposal to P&Z members at a brief February 5 public hearing. Under the plan, Fairfield Equine would create two apartments in existing attic space for veterinary students, known as “externs,” who work at the hospital for short periods.

  • School Board Considers Staff Child Care Program

    Superintendent of Schools Joseph V. Erardi, Jr, introduced the idea of a district staff child care program at the Board of Education’s meeting on Tuesday, February 17. Dr Erardi said the program presented to the school board comes “with the energy from [Monroe Learning Center Director Dawn Ryan], hoping that the Newtown board will look to support the opportunity.” Ms Ryan, Dr Erardi explained, offers a similar program for Monroe, and that program is based at Chalk Hill Middle School, where Sandy Hook Elementary School is also currently housed.

  • WSA Approves Sewer Connection For New Firehouse

    Following review, the Water & Sewer Authority has conditionally approved providing sanitary sewer service to the Newtown Hook & Ladder Volunteer Fire Company for the firehouse that it plans to construct at 12 Church Hill Road. The fire company plans to build an approximately 16,000-square-foot firehouse with a partial second story on the 3.16-acre site on the south side of Church Hill Road, across that street from Wendover Road.

  • Proposed 2015–16 School Budget Presented To BOF

    The Board of Finance opened its meeting on Thursday, February 19, with a public hearing on the proposed 2015–16 town of Newtown budget. Most who spoke, shared opinions specifically on the school district’s proposed 2015–16 budget, which was later presented to the Board of Finance by Board of Education Chair Keith Alexander and Superintendent of Schools Joseph V. Erardi, Jr. “We welcome anybody to come up and speak on any item in the budget,” said Board of Finance Chair John Kortze at the start of the public hearing.

  • Reconsidering A Lending Library For Parks

    In January 2014, Mary Kate Halmose raised the idea for creating lending libraries at several town parks. Although she initially meant to earn her Girl Scout Gold Award, her plans for the scouts have changed, but her ideas for the libraries have not. During a Parks and Recreation Commission meeting last week she told board members, “I did not go through with the project,” and has since graduated high school. She is no longer a scout, but she does want to go through with the project, Mary Kate told commission members Febeuary 10.

  • Newtown Families Want Bushmaster Lawsuit Returned To State Court

    (AP) The families of nine children and adults killed in the 2012 Newtown school shooting are asking a federal judge to return their lawsuit against gunmaker Remington to state court, where legal experts say it may have a better chance of succeeding.

  • Police News, February 6-14, 2015

    Police said they responded to a report of a motor vehicle accident that occurred on Huntingtown Road, near its intersection with Brushy Hill Road, at about 10 am on February 12. Police said one motorist was driving an SUV that ran off the road. A passenger received minor injuries. Police charged the motorist with driving under the influence, possession of alcohol by a minor, and making a restricted turn. Learn more about recent police activity in this week's report.

  • Town Meeting Seals Lanza Demolition Plans, Selectmen Approve Church Hill Road Foreclosure

    With about a dozen residents on hand to represent the entire community, a brief town meeting February 17 sealed plans to demolish the home at 36 Yogananda Street, where 12/14 perpetrator Adam Lanza and his late mother Nancy resided. Following that meeting, the Board of Selectmen also acted to initiate foreclosure on a key commercial parcel adjacent to eastbound I-84 on Church Hill Road.

  • Community Center Planning And Construction Forums Set

    The Parks & Recreation Commission and the Commission on Aging are coordinating a series of public information sessions regarding community center planning and construction prior to a March 21 referendum to approve project funding. Providing “the big picture” for people to understand, and “to hear their input on the possibilities of this phased project,” is the main goal of forums to be hosted by the Parks and Recreation Commission, said Parks and Recreation Department Director Amy Mangold.