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The Way We Were

May 27, 1988

The long-awaited steeple for the new Congregational Church arrived last week, but alas, it was the wrong color. In what was described as a comedy of errors, a mismatch of colors stalled the erection which has already been put off several times because of bad weather. It is hoped to have the correct steeple in place in six weeks or so according to Rod Gulick, coordinator of the building program. Meanwhile, the church is moving toward an expected first service in the church, June 19.

 

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One million, eight hundred eighty thousand dollars is a lot of money, but Robert and Shirley Frederick of Taunton Hill Road don’t think it will drastically affect their lives. “We’re not going to change our lifestyle significantly. We’re comfortable with what we’re doing, so we aren’t going to go out and buy a yacht and a BMW,” said Mr Frederick, whose wife bought the state’s only winning Lotto ticket for the May 17 drawing, worth $72,740 per year for 20 years, after taxes.

 

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The Police Commission has accepted a plan to install a four-way stop on Queen Street at the driveway to the shopping center south of the post office, making that driveway the main entrance and exit to the shopping center. The new plan will eliminate exits from the shopping center between the post office and Connecticut National Bank. The only other entrance to the center will be the driveway north of the bank. Currently the driveway south of the post office is only an exit.

 

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The Newtown Woman’s Club began with just 10 members 20 years ago and has since expanded both in membership and in community involvement and enrichment. A review of the events of the 20 years was a reminder of the power of individuals when united for a cause and the good that comes to a community through the efforts of ordinary persons.

 

May 31, 1963

The cover of the June Reader’s Digest, showing seven circus zebras going through their paces, is the work of Robert Lougheed of Eden Hill Road, Newtown. It is the 13th cover that he has painted for the magazine. Mr Lougheed is a circus fan, and famous for depicting circus life, as well as his drawings and paintings of animals of all kinds.

 

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The Bee birds are famous since Ed and Pegeen Fitzgerald “aired” them over WOR radio. The little robins right outside our window have grown so much that their big, open, yellow mouths almost fit them, but the nest no longer does. Already, the most adventurous, or clumsiest, has toppled to the ground. He was picked up on a file card by the Bee bookkeeper and plunked back into the nest.

 

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As a means of raising funds for the Main Street Tree Planting project, the committee in charge is arranging for a benefit movie which will be shown at the Edmond Town Hall theatre on Thursday evening, June 27. The committee considers itself fortunate in being able to show “Oklahoma,” featuring Gordon MacRae, Shirley Jones, Gene Nelson, and Gloria Grahame.

 

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On May 22, approximately 27 freshmen and sophomore members of the Business Club toured the main office building of S. Curtis and Son in Sandy Hook. Miss Ruth Craig of Curtis Box guided the girls on the tour, and told them of the general requirements and duties of the personnel employed in the office.

May 27, 1938

An “Old Time Frolic,” under the auspices of Pohtatuck Grange, will be held in the Alexandria Room of the Edmond Town Hall, Friday evening, June 10, at 8:30 o’clock. Modern and old-fashioned dancing will be featured, with music by Andrew’s Lake Shore Mountaineers of Ansonia. Tickets at 35 cents are now on sale.

 

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As the years go by, with shrinkage in the ranks of Civil War veterans, Memorial Day perhaps is losing some of its original significance. Yet it seems proper that it should continue to be fittingly observed. Wavings of flags, military display, loud spoken orations and hurrahs by the crowd have given way to quieter celebrations with more thought on the true meaning of the day. Such a program takes place in Newtown each year. Newtown has no veterans left, yet homage to their memory is quite in order.

 

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This week’s issue of The Bee may appear no differently to our readers than did our issue of a week ago. Yet there has been considerable change in our personnel, last Thursday bringing to a close the long years of service of Frank Wright. When a lad of 14 years, Mr Wright first started his career in newspaper work at that time in the employ of John Pierce who founded The Bee here in Newtown. He continued on the paper when it was taken over by Reuben H. Smith and ever since those early days has been a faithful worker and foreman of the composing room. Suffice it to say that in the neighborhood of 60 years has The Bee counted on his good work. And now Mr Wright has asked to be relieved from his arduous duties.

 

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The annual Tri-Town Contest among New Milford, Woodbury, and Hawley High students will be held in Newtown on the farms of Fred Presson and Josiah Tilson, on this Thursday, May 26. The contest will consist of estimating acreage, placing values on dairy cows, showmanship, estimating weight of broilers, killing and picking broilers, harnessing a horse and cultivating.

 

May 30, 1913

Jesse A. James and Mrs James went to New York, Thursday, with Mr James’ father, Jesse L. James, who is taking at trip south, looking over old war scenes as far south as Fortress Monroe, Va. and various points with which he was familiar during his long service in the war of the rebellion. Mr James was a member of the old Wooster Light Guards of Danbury and is one for the few that are left of the first company in this state to offer their assistance to the Government.

 

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An excellent piece of road improvement has been done on the flat beyond Berkshire from a point southeast of the location of where the Baptist church stood, where graveling has been done. It is also being continued west down the hill to join the fine road cared for by Henry G. Curtis.

 

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HIGH SCHOOL NOTES: In the recent tent caterpillar contest held in the school, few people seem to realize the great benefits to be derived from such work. These insect pests do thousands of dollars worth of damage every season: the 16,863 nests collected in Newtown probably mean a saving of some $2,000 value in fruits and trees. Could you find a more profitable investment?

 

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No new cases of scarlet fever have appeared and Dr W.H. Kiernan, the health officer, is hopeful that there will be no more. There is one case at Mrs Kelley’s one at M.J. Houlihan’s, and one in Sandy Hook, the latter Miss Keane, the teacher of the South Middle school in Newtown Street. Both the schools in Middle District were closed by the direction of the health officer. At the suggestion of Dr Kiernan the sessions of the Sunday schools at Trinity and the Congregational churches on Sunday last were omitted. The High school building was fumigated on Saturday and both of the school buildings in Middle district.

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