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February 10, 1989

First Selectman Rod Mac Kenzie’s explanation to the other members of the Board of Selectmen — pertaining to the recent town cleanup of private vacant land off Philo Curtis Road — does not square with the information that the Highway Department said it was given when Mr Mac Kenzie ordered the work done. Mr Mac Kenzie told the selectmen February 6 he had no prior knowledge that D’Addario Industries owned one of the properties; on February 9, the Highway Department showed The Newtown Bee a copy of a January 27 phone memo from Mr Mac Kenzie, in which Mr Mac Kenzie specifically ordered the cleanup of the D’Addario property. Mr Mac Kenzie said several neighbors had called to complain, and that he had told the Highway Department to haul away refuse visible from the road. Mr Mac Kenzie later told The Newtown Bee that if the Highway Department did indeed go further back on the property to pick up trash, that it did so without his telling them to do that.

 

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About 75 teens, parents, and other interested parties turned out for a forum Wednesday night in the Alexandria Room of Edmond Town Hall to discuss a proposed teen center to be opened, perhaps as early as this fall, in the old town garage on Church Hill Road. Those present at the forum were asked to consider several issues concerning the center, including how it should be run, how it would be supported, and who would be allowed to use it.

 

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The Newtown High School wrestling team went 3-1 over the last week, beating two Western Connecticut Conference foes along the way, running their final conference mark to 5-1, second best in the WCC. The Indians are currently 10-10 overall, and will complete their regular season Wednesday, February 15, at Holy Cross-Waterbury.

 

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Tons of paper is used in the course of a school year, according to the Newtown League of Women Voters, and that group would like the Board of Education to take a look at what’s happening to paper used in the Newtown school system. Judy Bottrill, speaking for the league, urged the board to begin or expand recycling efforts. She suggested the school reuse paper as scrap paper or for internal memos, and when the paper is no longer useful it should be collected in bins or cans for recycling at the landfill.

 

February 14, 1964

The Newtown Ambulance Association has purchased a new ambulance to serve the town. It is a 1964 Cadillac chassis with a body built by the Hess and Eisenhardt Company of Rossmoyne, Ohio. The new ambulance, which is the latest type with full equipment, will be on display at the Wheeler Shopping Center all day Saturday and in front of the Edmond Town Hall on Sunday, where townspeople are invited to inspect it.

 

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Dedication ceremonies for the Freedom Shrine at the Newtown High School will take place at the Newtown High School gymnasium February 21. The Freedom Shrine project is an undertaking by the Danbury Exchange Club to place framed documents of the American heritage in all local schools as a lasting reminder of what present day Americans owe to previous generations. All of the reproductions in the collection were made by photographic experts of the National Archives, Washington, DC, working directly from the original documents. Each reproduction is permanently mounted on an individual wood-grained plaque and protected against all forms of deterioration by the newest methods of plastic lamination.

 

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The sixth annual Mardi Gras Ball, sponsored by the St Rose Parents Guild and held at the K of C Hall last Saturday night, was an outstanding success. The beautifully decorated hall was filled to capacity with costumed revelers who apparently had a great evening’s fun. The Parade of Sponsors was the highlight of the night. Thirty-one businesses of Newtown and surrounding towns were represented by a mother or friend of the St Rose Parents Guild, who wore a costume depicting her sponsor’s service.

 

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The Public Building Committee of the Town of Newtown has approved architects’ plans and specifications for the new elementary school. The plans and specifications will be available for bidders after February 17. Superintendent Hinckley said he gave his “full endorsement” to the plans and specifications and would present them to the Board of Education this Thursday evening for their approval.

 

February 10, 1939

The interior of the store of Corbett and Crowe in Sandy Hook is being completely renovated and the alterations now in progress will make it one of the most modern stores in town. The front part of the store will be given over entirely to the drug department. New fixtures are being installed, as well as new type display cases. There will also be booths placed about the room for the sewing (sic) of fountain drinks. New compartments will be installed for the drugs. The rear room of the building is being made over so as to accommodate the grocery department.

 

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A Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars, was formed in Newtown on Monday evening, when about 35 veterans gathered at the fire house to start the organization. Robert D. Fairchild was elected commander of the post, the name of which was chosen as the Charles Howard Peck Sr and Jr Post, in tribute to Newtown’s distinguished war surgeon and his son, Charles Howard Peck, Jr, who died in France. Arthur J. Smith, Jr was named chairman of the committee to arrange for a formal installation ceremony, which is expected will be held towards the end of the month and to which Mrs Peck, widow of Dr Peck, will be invited.

 

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The skating, until Monday night’s snow, was quite good on a number of ponds locally. Sunday evening found a crowd at Carp Pond in Taunton district, some of those present indulging in a lively hockey game by moonlight. There were frequent rests while lost pucks were being located along the shore.

 

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Foreman William Corbett and his crew of state road workers have been doing excellent work this winter in keeping the roads clear of snow. Most of the storms this year have been at night and the men have been forced to work for long periods in order to have the roads cleared and the hills sanded for early morning traffic.

 

February 13 1914

The committee appointed by Pootatuck Grange to interview the management of the Borden’s Condensed Milk Co. have been in communication with the officials: “Dear Sir: The communication signed by yourself (Mr John J. Northrop), Mr Smith and Mr Camp, duly received. All plans have been made for withdrawing from Newtown at the close of business, March 31. This action is the result of operating at a loss at Newtown for a considerable period, due to lack of support… at present time we are receiving the product of but 29 dairies… would advise that we are willing to remain in Newtown if we could be assured of receiving 7,000 quarts of milk per day. Of course we would have to be assured of this at an early date as we have not made any arrangements for harvesting ice…also given notice to the Railroad Co that we intended to give up the lease…” W.H. Seeley, manager of the Industrial Bureau of the New York & New Haven road, was in town, in communication with Messrs Smith and Northrop, on the creamery proposition. Mr Seeley hopes to interest some large and responsible milk contractors in the Newtown creamery, in case the Borden’s decide to withdraw.

 

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While playing at the North Middle School on Monday, in running around the school building, Gertrude Brenner came in violent collision with Francis Ray, resulting in splintering a bone in one leg above the knee. The injured leg was put in a plaster cast. Dr Kiernan expects to take the girl to Danbury in a few days in order that the injured leg may be placed under an X-Ray light so as to determine the exact injury.

 

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At Sandy Hook, Thursday morning, the thermometer registered at 16 degrees below zero and in the Glen at 18 degrees below. This will hold those who were complaining about a chance to harvest ice for a few days.

 

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Through the efforts of First Selectman W.C. Johnson, the town has received an order from the State Comptroller on the State Treasurer, to pay the Town of Newtown in full for all expenses incurred in connection with the sickness, death and burial of Joseph Bates, (colored), who died at the Newtown Inn, last December. Mr Johnson also got busy concerning the funeral expenses of George E. Botsford, and prevailed on kind friends to pay the necessary expenses. Mr Botsford was for 25 years a town charge at Middletown, where he recently died. Selectman Johnson says he has always found our local physicians kind to the poor more especially when called upon to visit the worthy poor, oftentimes making no charges against those really needy and unfortunate.

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