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The Way We Were

March 24, 1989

“No thank you,” said Native American Jim Roaix to the argument that Newtown High School’s use of the Indian as a mascot was an honor to him and his people. On Monday night, Mr Roaix, the managing editor of The Eagle, an American Indian newspaper, stated his case to NHS principal Timothy Breslin and the student leadership council. Mr Roaix wants Newtown, as well as any other organization which uses an Indian-related mascot — a chief, a brave, a redskin, or a warrior — to change its mascot to something else. He doesn’t believe that students or teachers are intentionally hurting his people, but insists that they don’t realize how much they actually mock the Indian culture and how insulted Indians really feel about the whole ordeal.

 

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A Newtown Environmental Coalition formed this week and includes more than a dozen civic and community groups concerned with environmental issues in town. The group identified several areas of concern including drinking water, timely and accurate information about environmental problems, and the lack of responsiveness by federal, state, and local governments.

 

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Storm clouds threatened to wash out last Saturday morning’s Easter Celebration sponsored by the Parks and Recreation Department, but by the time approximately 200 youngsters gathered for the annual Easter Egg Hunt, the sun was shining and a better day couldn’t have been asked for. The day began with an Easter bonnet and top hat contest.

 

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The Board of Burgesses of the Borough of Newtown is considering replacing the sidewalks along Main Street with new, brick-like sidewalks, in order to make the street look more traditional in accordance with the historic district that is anticipated. Lee Glover, a member of the Board of Burgesses, said this week that the sidewalks, which are aged and cracked, will be replaced with Bominite, a substance which is press with a special form that makes it look like bricks. Mr Glover said that the idea is still in the planning stages, but the borough will probably go through with it.

 

March 27, 1964

Next Wednesday, April 1, will mark the start of the 38th year for Mrs Robert Blackman’s Tourist Home. The “Tourists” sign in front of the house is a familiar sight on Church Hill Road, where Mrs Blackman has been furnishing quarters for tourists for such a long time. She now calls it one of her hobbies. Nevertheless, she is to be congratulated for so many years of tourist hospitality at her attractive home.

 

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Student Town Government Day went off smoothly as elected student officials “took charge” and handled their obligations and responsibilities with distinction. Student officials spent a full Town Government Day on Tuesday, March 24, with the regular elected officials guiding them about and showing them the duties and responsibilities of the various town offices.

 

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In connection with the publication of a church history and a possible historical exhibit, the 250th anniversary committee of the Newtown Congregational Church would appreciate the loan of any pictures of former ministers, papers or other items of historic interest to our church. For further information as to the use of these items and how they will be cared for, please contact Mrs Thomas Cheney or Mrs William H. Foote.

 

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At last, retired persons and other senior citizens of Newtown can learn more about the greater joys and good-fellowship that go with the golden years when meeting together for that purpose by attending the organization meeting of the Sixty Plus Club April 1 at 2 pm at Fellowship Hall of the Newtown Methodist Church. The Rev Kenneth Halcott, pastor, who heads the promotion of the club, reports that already much interest in the plan is evident.

 

 

March 24, 1939

The St Patrick’s Day card party held on Friday evening at the Edmond Town Hall, under the auspices of the Men’s Discussion Group of St Rose church, proved to be a most successful affair. Over 150 people attended and various card games were enjoyed until 10:30, when cake and coffee were served. Prizes were awarded each table and the special door prize of a ton of coal donated by the Newtown Coal and Grain Company, was won by William R. Keane of Danbury.

 

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Scout News: On Saturday, seventeen boys met at headquarters at 10 o’clock and accompanied the Scoutmaster, assistant, and Mr Glover of the Connecticut Forest and Park Association to the Pohtatuck Trail. Starting at the Southbury line, they proceeded to clear and mark the trail as far as the Walnut Tree Hill Road. The sixty-foot ladder was repaired under the direction of Assistant Scoutmaster Jerry Jackson. The work was continued until 5 o’clock, and the troop can now be proud of one of the most beautiful walking trails in this part of Connecticut.

 

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Howe Smith of South Center district has just completed the building of a roadside stand opposite his home, at which he will sell poultry and eggs. Mr Smith will specialize in live poultry raised on his own farm. This poultry will be dressed free of charge. Fresh eggs and honey will also be carried.

 

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Alan H. Olmstead, associate editor of The Bridgeport Times-Star, gave a most enlightening talk before the Men’s Club, Tuesday evening, describing conditions as they exist in Europe today. Mr Olmstead sees grave danger, with war hovering over Europe, and likely to embroil this country. He regretted the failure of France and Great Britain to interfere in the taking of Czecho-Slavakia by Germany. Hitler, in his opinion, is determined to expand the German empire as far as possible. He described the regimentation existing in Germany and the feeling of support for Hitler and his Nazi regime, despite the stringent economic conditions prevailing throughout the country. To Mr Olmstead, one inferred, there is little hope for continued peace in Europe, and to him the situation as it may eventually affect this country, seems very grave.

 

March 27, 1914

An excellent opportunity to get your supply of summer wood is offered by George R. Wilson, who for $4 per cord, offers to place this wood in your yard already to use. The price is reasonable and as Mr Wilson gives good, plumb measure, the person who gives him their order will be well served.

 

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Mortimer Smith is to build a new barn, 24 x 48 feet, on is Mt Pleasant property. Selectman T.F. Brew has the contract. Mortimer Smith has a very fine pair of horses, bought in Mill Plain.

 

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At the meeting of citizens at the Brick building, last Saturday night, when about half a dozen were present, it was decided after an informal discussion and hearing the report of George A. Northrop, to abandon the project of buying the Borden ice house and convert it into a gymnasium. While the project was feasible and could be done at a comparatively small cost, lack of public interest in the matter caused the decision to abandon the project to be reached.

 

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Two prominent business men of Sandy Hook, Ezra J. Hall and Arthur J. Crowe are expecting to unite interests and go trout fishing the first day the law is off. “Ez” Hall is the crack trout fisherman, while “Art” Crowe has been talking about catching trout for 15 years and never has thrown a line in a brook. They have agreed to send their catch on that memorable day to the editor of The Bee, who is looking forward to the gift with great expectations.

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