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  • Senate Proposal Eliminating Subdivision Hearings Draws Local Opposition

    Three Newtown residents are among the latest to add their signatures and support in opposition to Connecticut Senate Bill 405.

    Former Newtown Wetlands Enforcement officer Ann Asterita along with Newtown Forest Association officers Guy Peterson and Robert Eckenrode have joined dozens of other individuals, municipalities, forest, land trust, and environmental groups standing against the proposal.

  • Brownfields Grant Will Aid FFH Hazmat Assessments

    Newtown was notified April 16 that it is the recipient of a $200,000 grant, which Director of Economic and Community Development Director Elizabeth Stocker said will be applied to assessing nine remaining buildings at Fairfield Hills for hazardous materials. The assessments will help the town estimate the cost of eventual hazmat remediation whether the building in question is slated for possible reuse or for demolition.

  • Library Board Loses Longtime Member

    Daniel Cruson, a longtime member of the C.H. Booth Board of Trustees, has submitted a letter of resignation to the president of the board. The letter, mailed to board President Martha Robilotti “over two weeks ago,” Mr Cruson said on Monday, April 14, was to be “effective upon the receipt of the letter.”

    Mr Cruson said that he has been cutting back on involvement in activities in order to devote more time to his writing and research.

  • Malloy Touts Success Of CT Jobs Program

    HARTFORD (AP)  — Governor Dannel Malloy is touting the success of a state program that promotes job creation by providing wage subsidies and training grants to small businesses.

    The initiative, known as the Subsidized Training and Employment Program or Step Up, help cover the costs of training new hires during the first six months of employment.

    Gov Malloy announced Friday that the initiative has led to the hiring of 2,200 new workers.

  • Right To Record Police A Focus Of Connecticut Bill

    HARTFORD — When East Haven police officers arrested a Catholic priest who was videotaping them in 2009, it sparked calls for the state legislature to better protect the public’s right to record the actions of law enforcement officials.

    Five years later, additional safeguards to that right have yet to make it to the governor’s desk. Bills approved in the Senate died in the House in 2011 and 2012. Legislation last year failed to make it to a House or Senate vote.

  • New Superintendent Begins Work

    Joseph V. Erardi, Jr, officially assumed his new post as Newtown superintendent of schools on Monday, April 14.

  • Library Board Hears Report On Director Search Focus Groups

    Dawn La Valle, Division of Library Development from the Connecticut State Library, reported to the C.H. Booth Library Board of Trustees, April 8, on the results of focus groups convened to comment on the library’s search for a new director.

  • Regionalized Emergency Dispatching Proposal Draws More Fire

    The Newtown Police Union opposes a town proposal that would have municipal emergency radio dispatching for 911, police, fire, and ambulance calls regionalized at a privately owned dispatching center in Prospect.

    The town has proposed regionalization as a cost-savings measure which would reduce spending by approximately $149,000 annually.

  • Prosecutor Explains Criminal Justice System At Citizen Police Academy

    The chief law enforcement officer for the Judicial District of Danbury described the state’s criminal justice system to participants at a recent Citizen Police Academy session, explaining the workings of the state’s criminal courts, which annually handle thousands of cases forwarded to them by police.

    Danbury State’s Attorney Stephen J. Sedensky III gave a talk, “Criminal Justice After An Arrest: The Prosecutor’s Perspective” to about 20 academy participants.

  • GE Logistics Expert Elizabeth Rallo Moving On

    For more than a decade preceding the Sandy Hook tragedy, Easton resident and GE Capital staffer Elizabeth Rallo engaged herself in the business of producing or analyzing numbers, systems, and data.

    But those analytical talents translated expertly into the many hands-on skills she brought to bear on behalf of Newtown in the nearly one year she served the community coordinating special projects and facilitating communications among various groups and project managers post-12/14.