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  • Judge Rejects State's Request To Delay School Funding Trial

    Hartford Superior Court Judge Kevin Dubay summarily rejected the state's request January 16 for a lengthy postponement of an education-funding lawsuit over whether the state is meeting its constitutional responsibility of providing a “suitable education” for every child in Connecticut.

  • School Funding Lawsuit Needs To Go Forward

    A hearing was scheduled for Thursday in Hartford Superior Court as The Bee went to press this week for arguments over whether a lawsuit challenging the equity of funding the state’s public schools filed in 2005 will finally go forward or be delayed for more than a year.

  • Officials Flag Student Enrollment Decline As Significant Taxpayer Concern

    A growing number of officials believe that helping residents better understand the relationship between declining student enrollment and the amount school leaders will ask taxpayers to underwrite next year could help pass the annual budget referendum sooner.

    Providing additional evidence to taxpayers that town and district leaders are working collaboratively, and with mutual support for each other’s spending proposals, could also go far toward propelling a first-round budget vote to passage, some officials believe.

  • Force Feeding Students And Teachers?

    To the Editor:

    With good conscience I need to speak out to the caring public regarding a serious government intrusion into the local public schools. The reason for this is that politics and academic theory often mix poorly with good teaching practices in the classroom.

  • New Beginnings At The Bus Stop

    It is a paradox of human relations that the ones we hold closest to our hearts thrive when we loosen our grip. Given what we know about child development and education, it is easy for parents to see the sense of it. But Tuesday morning, as children headed out to the bus stops, this small “letting go” for the coming school year may have, for many, proved to be a most difficult moment of surrender. Newtown is no longer a town where people can find consolation by telling themselves that things always turn out for the best.

  • A Plea From The Board of Education

    To the Editor:

    The Board of Education would like to invite Newtown residents to join us in supporting the budget in the coming referendum by voting Yes.

    The district will face many known and unknown challenges in the coming year as a result of December 14th. It is imperative that we have the appropriate resources to do so. By not supporting the education budget we will run the risk of losing what our district has worked so hard to gain, improved academic performance in our district.

  • Joining The New Information Revolution

    To the Editor:

    As we approach the next referendum on the education budget, it would seem appropriate we consider why the budget was voted down on two previous occasions.

    Many residents in Newtown are wondering about the reason why we were asked last time to answer  same two questions about the budget being too high or too low. I thought they got their answer in the first budget vote. Are they going to insult our intelligence and ask the same questions?

  • A Vote For Educational Consistency

    To the Editor:

    As the third referendum approaches, I would like to take a moment to request that residents vote “Yes!” on Tuesday, June 4 in support of education. 

  • A Call To Support Education

    To the Editor:

    This letter is an entreaty to the voters of Newtown to support the education budget at this third referendum scheduled for Tuesday, June 4.  The budget request as it stands now calls for a year over year increase of 3.93 percent, having been further reduced by the Legislative Council in response to the failed second referendum.

  • The Pulse Of The Town

    It is not uncommon for people working in a newspaper office to hear themselves described by others as having their fingers on the pulse of the town. But from where we sit, the business of community assessment and diagnosis is not as simple as that. Newtown’s lifeblood flows from myriad hearts beating, at times, in cacophonous syncopation. And rarely is it more difficult to discern what the heart of the town is telling us than in the wake of a failed budget referendum.