• Celebrate With A Bang, But Also With Some Consideration

    To the Editor:

    As the summer begins, so do picnics, parties and fireworks.

  • The Police And PTSD

    By the spring of 2014, Officer Thomas Bean had been off the duty roster of the Newtown Police Department for more than a year. The post traumatic stress disorder he suffered following the December 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings had disabled him to the point where he could no longer work in his chosen career as a police officer. He had struggled with depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts since responding to the mass murder of 20 first graders and six educators.

  • State Bills Would Expand Worker’s Compensation Law

    HARTFORD — The Newtown Police officer who has not yet returned to work since the 2012 school massacre because of post-traumatic stress disorder urged Connecticut lawmakers on Tuesday to expand the state’s workers’ compensation law to cover the condition.

  • In 12/14 PTSD Case, Police Chief Withdraws Job Termination Recommendation

    Police Chief Michael Kehoe has reversed an earlier position and decided against pursuing job termination against Police Officer Thomas Bean, a town police officer who responded to the 12/14 mass shooting incident at Sandy Hook School and subsequently has been off work since then due to a medical diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

  • Union Pushes For Talks On Disabled Cop’s Departure

    A town police officer diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), who has not worked since the December 14 shootings at Sandy Hook School, has been informed by the town that he could be fired as a police officer.

    Town officials have nothing to say on the topic, declining comment and terming the issue a personnel matter.

  • Preparing For Traumatic Aftershocks

    To the Editor:

  • Columbine Survivor To Speak At C.H. Booth Library

    Columbine High School shooting survivor Amber Wright will present a book talk on her children’s book, It Gets Better, on Thursday evening, May 23, in the C.H. Booth Library meeting room. The program will run from 6:30 to 8 pm.

    Ms Wright, an elementary school teacher and mother, witnessed the shootings in the library of her high school on April 20, 1999, in which 13 of her classmates and teachers died. She was just 17 years old and a senior at the school at that time.

  • Specialist Helps Newtown Assess Its Post-Traumatic Support Response

    Jill Barron, MD, MHS, has been quietly ramping up plans to conduct a critical needs assessment of mental health and support response since arriving in Newtown in late February. But the experienced trauma specialist who worked with New York firefighters post 9/11 made her first local public appearance, receiving an official welcome when she was introduced to the Board of Selectmen March 18.

  • Malloy Signs Legislation For Sandy Hook Workers

    HARTFORD – Governor Dannel P Malloy held a bill signing ceremony at the State Capitol on Tuesday to commemorate the passage of legislation that creates a special fund to assist individuals who suffered psychological trauma as a result of their work related to the Sandy Hook tragedy. 

    He was joined by a bipartisan group of lawmakers, Newtown First Selectman Pat Llodra, Newtown Police Captain Joe Rios, and others to mark the occasion.

  • Facing Post-12/14 Expenses, Staffing, Police Assess The ‘New Normal’

    As time passes following the December 14 Sandy Hook School massacre of 20 children and six adults, town police officials are assessing the implications of the event in terms of future police staffing and the security levels that will be required at local schools.

    They also are considering the prospect of police activity returning to normal, as adaptation to new conditions occurs.

    The Police Commission and police command staff members discussed the many ramifications of the 12/14 incident at a March 5 session.