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  • A Tax You Can Vote Down

    To the Editor:

    My fellow taxpayers, does it seem a ridiculous question to ask why taxes cannot go down?  Must taxes forever take more of what you work so hard for? 

    In the recent 12 months, we have experienced increasing local, state and federal taxes… with absolutely no increase in services.  We have fewer students in our schools, but taxes go up?  Does it seem that taxes must somehow defy the laws of supply and demand?  With less demand, the price should go down… shouldn't it?

  • Falling Assessments Account for 23% Drop In Grand List

    Newtown Assessor Chris Kelsey has calculated the latest town grand list figures as of October 1, 2012, which indicate local property assessments are down 23.22 percent. As a result, many Newtown property owners will see a slight drop in their residential taxes this year.

  • State Revenue Semantics

    Some would say Governor Dannel P. Malloy was a man of courage for vowing not to raise taxes going into FY2014, where a $1.2 billion revenue shortfall awaits him. And it seems he is undertaking this daunting mission armed only with a fertile imagination and some well-honed semantics.

  • EDC Wants To Expand Business Incentive Benefits

    The local Economic Development Commission is retooling the language and is seeking changes to Newtown’s Business Incentive benefits to accommodate more of the types of new enterprises the town expects to see developing in the coming years. First Selectman Pat Llodra has mentioned the EDC’s desire to improve and enhance the program during several meetings in recent weeks.

  • Newtowners Paid $12 Million More After Retroactive Tax Increase

    As Newtown struggled through its 2011 budget process, Board of Finance Vice Chair Joe Kearney was also watching closely as Governor Dannel P. Malloy rolled out a retroactive personal income tax increase in an effort to close an anticipated shortfall in state revenue projections.

    At the time, Newtown’s Senator and State Minority Leader John McKinney decried the measure, calling it a massive new financial burden on the state’s middle class coming at a time when taxpayers could least afford it.

  • Applicants For Local Tax Credit Could Face New Asset Test

    Finance Board Vice Chairman Joe Kearney believes that most applicants under Newtown’s Senior and Disabled Tax Credit program will only request the nominal benefit if they qualify. But he is hoping the town will soon require applicants to sign an affidavit promising they are not holding assets that would otherwise be hidden from officials verifying income from candidates’ tax returns.