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David Bass

  • Theater Review: An Astounding Cast, A Strong Director For ‘The Normal Heart’

    BROOKFIELD — The Brookfield Theatre of the Arts production of Larry Kramer’s The Normal Heart, under the direction of David Bass, is pretty much flawless.

    Full disclosure here, I love this play.  It pulls back the curtain on a dark time in American history, when many were willing to turn a blind eye to a plague striking an entire population deemed to be different. Because of their preferences, they were marginalized in their time of suffering and need. Tissues should be provided with the tickets.

  • Town Players To Go ‘Fully Committed’

    Town Players of Newtown will continue its summer of laughs with a special production of Fully Committed by Becky Mode, who has created a show for those who love the hilarity of fast-paced farces.

    Fully Committed follows a day in the life of Sam Peliczowski, an “in between gigs” actor who takes reservations at Manhattan’s hottest restaurant. Coercion, threats, bribes, histrionics — a cast of desperate callers will stop at nothing in their quest to land a prime reservation (or the right table).

  • Theater Review: "The Little Dog Laughed," And Nobody Napped, At The Little Theatre

    When a production is billed as a comedy, it is not always clear what to expect. Frequently, audiences are treated to a farce, with lots of doors from which spouses emerge at inopportune times, or through which lovers and other problems are shoved, so as not to be caught on forbidden ground. Then there are screwball comedies, whose humor depends on bizarre situations, like Cary Grant and Katherine Hepburn singing “I can’t give you anything but love, Baby,” to a leopard as they try to retrieve a missing dinosaur bone.

  • Town Players To Host Auditions For "Little Dog Laughed"

    Town Players of Newtown will host auditions for Douglas Carter Beane’s The Little Dog Laughed on Sunday and Monday, March 10-11.

    In this scathingly funny, of-the-moment show that was originally produced off-Broadway at the Second Stage Theater, actor Mitchell becomes involved in a physical relationship with hustler Alex. As a result, Diane, his acerbic agent, worries that Mitchell’s “slight recurring case of homosexuality” will put the kibosh on his career permanently.