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Deep Brook

  • IWC Endorses Concrete Work At Animal Sanctuary Site

    Following discussion at a November 12 session, Inland Wetlands Commission (IWC) members  unanimously endorsed, after the fact, the recent construction of a 576-square-foot concrete pad at a 34-acre site at Fairfield Hills to be used as a pedestal for sculpture at a planned animal sanctuary.

  • Macroinvertebrates Collected In Water Quality Study

    “Riffle-dwelling benthic macroinvertebrate sampling project” is a mouthful.

    Put more simply, a private coldwater fisheries conservation group recently sponsored a field project during which volunteers armed with collection gear retrieved various examples of such tiny animals from local streams and rivers in seeking to gauge those waterbodies’ cleanliness, and thus suitability as trout habitat.

  • Unusual Water Prompts Testing Near Deep Brook

    Sediment, possibly from Fairfield Hills, may have washed into a Deep Brook tributary, Land Use officials learned Monday, October 20.

  • Deep Brook Takes Another Hit

    To the Editor:

  • Rooftops, Parking Lots Pose A Threat To Deep Brook

    To the Editor:

    The division between doing the right thing for one thing and the right thing for another thing gets as confusing as the beginning of this sentence.

  • Securing The Future Of A Pristine Deep Brook

    To the Editor:

    The Candlewood Valley Chapter of Trout Unlimited has been working with town, state and federal agencies to protect the waters of Newtown for more than a decade. During that time we have raised over $250,000 for this work and community members have volunteered thousands of hours to restore and protect habitat along Deep Brook, the Pootatuck River, and Pond Brook.

  • Bringing A Stream Back To Life And Sunlight

    Slipping over a stone riverbed for the first time in decades is a tributary flowing through Dickinson Park. The stream now runs from a bog across Point O’ Rocks Road to Deep Brook, which winds through the park. Resurfaced in the fall of 2012, the stream had previously been piped underground.

    Thanks to past human handiwork, water that once traveled aboveground had disappeared.