economic development

  • Something Scary In Botsford

    It looks like the setting for a post-apocalyptic summer thriller, though Newtown has been less than thrilled about having this blighted property sitting unused for decades in the heart of Botsford. The 30-acre former Batchelder site at 44 and 46a Swamp Road is a scary place, and not just because of its aspect of desolation and abandonment. It is environmentally scary.

  • Matchmaking At Fairfield Hills

    The Fairfield Hills Authority’s latest flirtation with economic development at the spacious campus home of Newtown’s seat of government hit a snag, as have so many of the other potential liaisons with commercial suitors that have come calling. US HealthVest, a developer of behavioral health facilities, had expressed interest in creating a 100-bed psychiatric hospital at Fairfield Hills.

  • Sell Our School

    To the Editor:

    At the heart of Newtown’s commercial area is the Middle School, a large lot, with an existing building with a large footprint, two driveways on Queen Street and the back of the lot which abuts the Caraluzzi and Villages at Lexington Gardens commercial properties.

     Why close the school when it can be sold?  The sale will bring much needed cash into the town’s coffers, broaden our tax base and reduce residential real estate taxes.

  • Building Wealth For Newtown

    As town and school budgetmakers assemble the 2015-16 budget line item by line item, they are girding themselves for upcoming hearings on their spending plans, beginning with a February 3 hearing on the school budget. Newtown residents — at least those residents who vote in budget referendums — seem to think their tax burden is heavy enough. They traditionally balk at tax rate increases of anything more than a percent or so. No matter how well crafted or justified school and town budgets may be, they are a hard sell.

  • Housing At Fairfield Hills

    In the ten years since Newtown purchased the state-owned property that served Connecticut for more than 60 years as a psychiatric hospital, the evolution of 186-acre campus at Fairfield Hills has been mostly municipal. The site is now the seat of Newtown’s government. Attempts to stimulate commercial interest there, however, have sputtered. The one notable exception was the opening of the 86,000-square-foot Newtown Youth Academy in 2008. But now, there is even talk of an eventual town takeover of that facility as well.

  • A Development Opportunity At Fairfield Hills

    To the Editor:

  • Housing Is Still A Bad Idea For FFH

    To the Editor:

    They are talking about housing at Fairfield Hills Campus again!  They never give up. Mainly the Economic Development Commission, the Planning and Zoning Commission , and the Fairfield Hills Authority.

  • New Leadership Stresses ‘Open For Business’ Commitment

    From right, First Selectman Pat Llodra, Director of Planning George Benson, Economic Development Coordinator Betsy Paynter, and Grant Coordinator Christal Preszler welcome potential business developers to meet this new local team committed to supporting responsible, environmentally sound development, creating a strong local economy and increasing the tax base to offset the residential tax burden for residents.                

  • A Shift In Newtown’s Bureaucracy

    There is a strip of open space that runs from the south to the north and east, skirting behind the ball fields at Reed Intermediate School, along Old Farm Road by open fields toward the point near Commerce Road where the Pootatuck River joins Deep Brook. Conservation Commission Chair Ann Astarita told The Bee last week that she is particularly concerned about this tract, known as the Deep Brook Open Space. It is supposed to protect Deep Brook, one of just nine Class I trout streams in the state.

  • Officials Ramping Up Focus On New Businesses, Economic Development

    With deliberations and the authorization by voters of the 2014-15 budget behind them, local officials are focusing intensely on the best way they see for keeping residential taxation in check — growing the Newtown Grand List. That means increasing commercial activity, supporting economic development, and aggressively working to retain or expand businesses already established locally.