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  • The Top of the Mountain

    The Newtown Cultural Arts Commission has revamped its newsletter, “Vibrant Arts for a Healthy Community.” You can subscribe to the twice monthly, free, arts newsletter at www.newtownartscommission.org/newsletter, where you will also find out how you can promote your art event in the newsletter. The newsletter serves the arts organizations in town, as well as individual artists, and Newtown youth artists.

  • The Top of the Mountain

    Instagram user @chanecullens has been keeping The Newtown Bee’s Instagram photos at newtownbee.com full of photos of birds in the last few weeks. She has uploaded three beautiful pictures of birds since the end of January, but this week is my favorite: a cat. According to the post, the cat was out prowling for mice in the snow. You can see for yourself that this brave feline was certainly claw deep.

  • Contribute To The Bee’s Instagram Feed

    Instagram users can contribute photos to The Newtown Bee’s main website page by using #viewfromnewtown in a photo’s description.

    Recent contributions have shown snowy images of Newtown, people ice fishing on Taunton Lake, the view of Main Street from Castle Hill Drive, The Matthew Curtiss House at 44 Main Street, and a night view of the flagpole on Main Street.

  • The Top of the Mountain

    Letters from Sandy Hook — Newtown to the World, compiled and edited by Sandy Hook resident Suzanne Davenport, has been released. The book is available at The Newtown Bee office, C.H. Booth Library, and Everything Newtown. The cost of the book is $30 and when purchased at any of the abovementioned locations, all of the proceeds will be donated directly to the Newtown Memorial Fund. The book is available on Amazon, but the foundation gets only three percent of the proceeds in that case.

  • The Top of the Mountain

    I had on my running paws this past Saturday, but the vast crowd at the Hartford Marathon intimidated me. So I stayed on the sidelines. My ears perked up during the blessing of the runners before the start of the 26.2-mile race, though, when I thought I heard a familiar voice. That made me scramble up the nearest tree to look over the mob, to the steps of the State Capital, where I saw Newtown Congregational Church minister Reverend Matt Crebbin offering words of thanks and inspiration.