• Design District Zoning. Designed For What?

    Twenty years ago, Newtown’s Planning and Zoning Commission implemented an innovative zoning concept to address its goal at the time of encouraging diverse yet compatible uses in Sandy Hook Center while preserving its essential character as a mixed-use hamlet with deep roots in the community’s commercial history.

  • Keeping Common Species Common

    As we have advanced through the industrial and technological ages with their attendant innovations and accomplishments, a human conceit has arisen that our modern impulse to “go big or go home” has somehow made us masters of our environment. While we have proven quite adept at shaping the environment to accommodate our preferences for convenience and commerce, our mastery, however, insofar as it applies to natural ecosystems, seems to lean mostly toward their degradation and destruction.

  • Information Vital To Deep Brook’s Quality

    To the Editor:

  • Bob-o-link Paradise

    To the Editor:

    What is it about birds that we find so fascinating and awe-inspiring? Is it their ability to break the bonds of gravity and freely move in any direction, their ability to navigate across countries or even continents, their songs which capture our imaginations, or their visibility which keeps us so connected to nature?

  • Deep Brook Takes Another Hit

    To the Editor:

  • A Shift In Newtown’s Bureaucracy

    There is a strip of open space that runs from the south to the north and east, skirting behind the ball fields at Reed Intermediate School, along Old Farm Road by open fields toward the point near Commerce Road where the Pootatuck River joins Deep Brook. Conservation Commission Chair Ann Astarita told The Bee last week that she is particularly concerned about this tract, known as the Deep Brook Open Space. It is supposed to protect Deep Brook, one of just nine Class I trout streams in the state.

  • More Follow-Through Needed For Connecticut’s Open Space Plan

    Two years ago, when the governor signed Public Act 12-152, An Act Concerning the State’s Open Space Plan, the new law was heralded as evidence of Connecticut’s enlightened approach to conservation. Not only was the initiative seen as an endorsement of the state’s goal of extending open space protections to 673,210 acres — 21 percent of the state’s area — by 2023, it was intended to foster the same kind of strategic planning to open space protection that is normally accorded to land development.

  • Rooftops, Parking Lots Pose A Threat To Deep Brook

    To the Editor:

    The division between doing the right thing for one thing and the right thing for another thing gets as confusing as the beginning of this sentence.