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  • State Police Dispatching Procedures Modified

    The Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection (DESPP) commissioner said April 16 that she has completed her preliminary review of consolidated state police radio dispatching and has formulated a plan for moving forward. Dora Schriro said that all administrative calls, which do not include a call for service by state troopers, will be directed to the local barracks where they are best handled locally by personnel at the barracks, in person or by phone. All 911 calls requiring the dispatching of troopers will continue to be directed to consolidated dispatch locations, in keeping with a growing trend to focus on consolidating 911 calls in the interest of improved public safety, she said. The formation of both a working group of in-house experts, including dispatchers, troopers and sergeants, and an advisory group, comprised of representatives of municipalities, will be employed to elicit feedback on an ongoing basis and address issues and concerns as they arise, she said.

  • Parent Connection Guest Speaker To Address Nature, Mentors & Community

    Community, nature, and mentoring all play key roles in raising healthy children, said Two Coyotes Wilderness School Executive Director Justin Pegnataro. He will present the talk “It Takes A Village To Raise A Child” on Wednesday, April 23, at the Newtown Prevention Council’s Par...

  • Newtown Recovery Project Sets Next Parent Forums: Stress Management, Video Game Addiction

    The Newtown Public Schools Recovery Project has slated its next parent forums, which will be held at Reed Intermediate School and Hawley Elementary School. Each forum will be presented twice, once during the school day and in the evening, to allow for maximum participation. Forums run for one hour. The Reed Parent Forum, “Springtime Stress Management,” is set for Wednesday, April 23. The Hawley Parent Forum, “Video Game Addiction,” will be on Thursday, April 24.

  • ‘Zero Increase’ Budget Backers Call For Taxpayers To Turnout, Vote Yes

    A growing number of elected leaders representing the Legislative Council, and the Boards of Education, Selectmen, and Finance are calling for taxpayers to turn out April 22 and vote Yes on both the town and school district budget requests. Even Newtown’s new School Superintendent Joseph V. Erardi, Jr., stepped up after just two days on the job requesting residents get out the vote — although he stopped short of suggesting how to vote since he was not involved in formulating the district’s proposal. Voters will cast bifurcated, or split town and school, budget ballots by absentee vote now, or in person April 22 at Newtown Middle School between 6 am and 8 pm.

  • Officials Brief Seniors On Proposed Tax Relief Program Updates

    Nearly three dozen local seniors turned out Wednesday evening to learn about the details and ask questions on the proposed updates to a senior tax relief initiative currently being tapped by more than 2,000 homeowners. Several updates to the current program and its related ordinance will be the subject of a planned public hearing on May 7 in the Newtown Municipal Center legislative chambers at 7 pm. The information forum April 16 was the latest in a series of meetings that have been going on across the community for months, as elected officials have responded to private homes and age-restricted communities to discuss and learn more about the concerns and challenges local seniors are facing. Speaking to The Newtown Bee before the meeting, Board of Finance Chairman John Kortze said that during the most recent gatherings, response to the tax relief program and its proposed updates have been well received. “The feedback and input we’re getting has been overwhelmingly positive,” Mr Kortze said. “These meetings are an opportunity to give seniors a voice, and to let them be heard.”

  • Council Chair Clarifies Misinformation In Letter, Social Network Posts

    Shortly after reviewing a letter to the editor in this week’s pre-budget vote edition of The Newtown Bee, Legislative Council Chair Mary Ann Jacob reached out hoping to clarify what she believes is a lingering misconception regarding the council’s ability to add funds back if the school and/or town proposals fail at referendum April 22. Ms Jacob said that while the issue of whether or not the council can add more money to either side appears to be a point of contention among a few residents, she is concerned that misinformation could still confuse budget voters, or worse, cause them to opt out of casting a budget ballot next Tuesday. Ms Jacob said it is critical for residents and taxpayers to understand the fine print in Newtown's Charter, which only empowers the council to add back funds up to the amount originally requested by the Boards of Education and Selectmen. This year's budget is somewhat of an anomaly because after the Boards of Education and Selectmen made their final requests, the Board of Finance added funds to both budget lines.

  • Local Savings Bank Officials, BBB Warn Internet Users About ‘Heartbleed’

    Local businesses including Newtown Savings Bank and the Connecticut Better Business Bureau have been busy alerting business owners about the “Heartbleed” security flaw that targets computer servers running the most widely used Internet encryption security system. According to BBB, security engineers discovered that Heartbleed exploits a flaw in OpenSSL, which allowed them to view passwords and user names when they tested the virus. Within 24 hours of the news about Heartbleed, Newtown Savings Bank officials were assuring customers that none of the bank’s sites are or have been vulnerable to the threat. Bank customers were notified, however, that many popular Internet sites have been vulnerable.

  • I-84 Bridge Work At Center Street About Half Done

    An ongoing $6 million state project to replace two Interstate-84 bridges, which cross above Center Street in the Riverside section of Sandy Hook, is about half complete, according to a state Department of Transportation (DOT) spokesman. Matthew Cleary, a transportation supervising engineer, said April 15 that construction work at the bridges resumed in early April following a cold, lengthy winter. “We just started back up for the [construction] season,” he said. Construction records indicate that about one-half of the construction work has been completed, he said. Mr Cleary said that DOT plans to have the bridge project substantially complete by late November, with certain details such as landscape plantings, to be done in the spring of 2015. Work on the project started in the spring of 2013 and continued until late December before halting for the winter.

  • Renovation Project Announced: Glen Road ‘Silver Bridge’ To Be Silver Again

    What locally has long been known as “The Silver Bridge” will regain its argentine luster after the state completes an estimated $5 million renovation project intended to physically rehabilitate the steel-truss span at Glen Road, which crosses the Lake Zoar section of the Housatonic River, linking Sandy Hook to Southbury. A state Department of Transportation (DOT) spokesman said this week that the two-lane, 308-foot-long bridge, which currently is painted brown, will be repainted a silvery color, based on local requests. DOT spokesman Kevin Nursick said the bridge repair project will also include repairs to the span’s steel trusses, repainting steel members, the cleaning and painting of bridge bearings, and renovations to the structure’s concrete deck.

  • Brownfields Grant Will Aid FFH Hazmat Assessments

    Newtown was notified April 16 that it is the recipient of a $200,000 grant, which Director of Economic and Community Development Director Elizabeth Stocker said will be applied to assessing nine remaining buildings at Fairfield Hills for hazardous materials. The assessments will help the town estimate the cost of eventual hazmat remediation whether the building in question is slated for possible reuse or for demolition. Governor Dannel P. Malloy announced Wednesday that the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD) has awarded $3,821,000 in grants to 21 communities to advance the development of brownfield sites throughout the state.