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  • School Board Approves 2014-15 Budget Calendar

    The Board of Education approved its budget development calendar for the 2014-15 fiscal year at its meeting on Tuesday, October 1. According to the draft of the budget calendar, Interim Superintendent of Schools John Reed will present the proposed budget to the school board for analysis during a meeting scheduled for January 21. The school board will deliberate and vote for its budget by a scheduled February 6 meeting, before the budget is sent before the Board of Finance and the Legislative Council before going out to referendum on April 22...

  • Police Reports September 23 - 28, 2013

    Ford Vs Honda Police said motorist Mitchell Roberts, 17, of 20 Fieldstone Drive was driving a 2010 Ford Focus sedan northward on South Main Street, near Peck’s Lane, behind northbound motorist Patrick Christopher, 49, ...

  • Early Morning Two-Truck Crash On I-84 Causes Major Travel Delays

    An accident involving two trucks after 5 am on Thursday, October 3, on westbound Interstate 84, about one mile west of Exit 9, caused extensive travel delays on westbound I-84 and adjacent local roads during the morning rush. Initially reported as having occurred on westbound I-84 between Exits 10 and 9, the call resulted in Newtown Hook & Ladder and Hawleyville volunteer firefighters responding to the incident. Hook & Ladder Chief Ray Corbo served as incident commander. An unidentified male was transported to Danbury Hospital after a panel truck he had pulled to the side of the interstate, after striking a deer, was hit by a tractor-trailer truck that was attempting to avoid hitting additional deer. Neither driver was seriously injured. The accident caused major delays on the highway as well as secondary roads for hours.

  • Fire Reports September 26 - October 3, 2013

    The dispatchers at the Newtown Emergency Communications Center at 3 Main Street report the following fire calls and the responders:   Thursday, September 26: 10:30 am, residential fire alarm, 1...

  • Testimony Continues In Heath Murder Trial

    DANBURY – A half-sister of John Heath, who had worked with him as a commercial painter, testified in court on Tuesday, October 1, that she told him that she smelled “something that was dead” in the barn on his property at 89 Poverty Hollow Road in Newtown, at some point not long after Mr Heath had allegedly murdered his wife Elizabeth in April, 1984, hiding her body in a drywell beneath the barn’s floor. Louann Chevalier testified in Danbury Superior Court on the second day of the murder trial that Mr Heath responded that maybe there was something dead in the barn, perhaps wildlife, such as a bat.

  • Library Board Of Trustees Must Balance Town And Private Support

    The C.H. Booth Library operates under an “interesting duality,” said Newtown First Selectman Pat Llodra in an e-mail to The Bee, last month. “It is housed in a municipal building, its employees are in our pension plan, we subsidize (in part) the library program with taxpayer money, and more — all indicators consistent with ‘public.’ However,” explained Mrs Llodra, “we do not supervise their employees, they are not part of our unions, the Library Board is responsible for maintaining the building, and the majority of the board are not appointed by the Selectmen.”

  • Minor Fire Temporarily Closes Newtown General Store

    UPDATE (9:40 am): Health Department Director Donna Culbert has cleared Newtown General Store to reopen for business. ***** Newtown Hook & Ladder, Sandy Hook and Hawleyville firefighters were alerted at 7:07 am Monday of a fire at Newtown General Store at 43 Main Street. Initially reported as a structure fire, the incident was soon downgraded to an “appliance fire.” Deputy Fire Marshal Rich Frampton said that a gas-fired cooking range had ignited while in use. There were no injuries. Damage was minimal. Health Department Director Donna Culbert was planning to be at the store by 10 am, she told The Bee Monday morning. She hoped to be able to clear the business to reopen “in time for lunch traffic,” she said.

  • Family Of Newtown Victim Talks Gun Control Politics, Misrepresentations

    BETHLEHEM (AP) — The Paradis and D’Avino family knows guns. They’ve owned them and enjoyed hunting and target shooting. Shooting was just part of life, like the time after Thanksgiving dinner in 2009 when a guest of husband and wife Peter Paradis and Mary D’Avino brought out an AR-15 rifle he had in the car. Together, with their children, the couple spent time shooting at a tree in their backyard on five acres off heavily wooded Route 61. Paradis and his stepdaughter, Hannah D’Avino, recalled that holiday afternoon recently. They sat their kitchen table and reminisced about Hannah’s sister, Rachel D’Avino. Rachel’s murder has not marred her family’s memory of that holiday afternoon. For a family of marksmen, it also has not changed their views about guns.

  • Parks Named After 9/11, 12/14 Victims Vandalized

    A Long Island park named after the former commanding officer of the Port Authority Police Academy who died during the 9/11 attacks has been vandalized. Within 24 hours, police say, a second park, this one just built to honor one of the children killed on 12/14, was also vandalized. Nassau County Police say the damage to Kathy Mazza Memorial Park, in South Farmingdale, L.I., included flowers being torn from the ground and thrown around the memorial, branches from surrounding trees were ripped off, and bricks from a wall around the memorial were removed. In Island Park, approximately 14 miles southwest of South Farmingdale, police say a bell dedicated to Caroline Previdi, one of the children who died in the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre, vanished just hours after it was placed at a newly built playground. The park was the latest built and dedicated as part of the ongoing "Sandy Ground Project: Where Angels Play," being spearheaded by The New Jersey Firefighter's Mutual Benevolent Association.

  • Prolonged Federal Shutdown Could Damage Connecticut's Fragile Recovery

    As the federal government stood at the brink of a shutdown, state and business leaders were most wary Monday of a prolonged stoppage. Though many of the 9,000 federal employees residing in Connecticut could be furloughed shortly after the new fiscal year begins Tuesday, a potential lag in billions in federal dollars earmarked for the Nutmeg State poses the biggest threat to state government. And should a shutdown linger for several weeks, or more than a month, both furloughs and a bottleneck in federal aid could undo much of Connecticut’s already sluggish recovery from the last recession.