Letters


Leaps Of Love

Published: April 16, 2018 at 12:00 am

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To the Editor:

Two years ago I suffered a traumatic accident that took my right leg and left me paralyzed from the waist down. After much physical therapy and with the love and support of family, friends, and neighbors I can now take care of myself, drive myself around in a modified van, and work part time. Another key piece of my recovery and future survival though is recreational activity. How incredible is it then that the LOF Adaptive Skiers program that people with all types of disabilities will drive over 100 miles to get to, is right here in my town?

I was introduced to LOF and took my first ride on a mono-ski with a seat for paraplegics on Lake Zoar last summer. I was a little apprehensive at first but then ten seconds into my first ride I knew this was for me. It worked my abdominal muscles, arms, and shoulders and was just plain fun. But LOF is about more than just exercise for the disabled. There are approximately 100 people who volunteer each season to make it work, most of whom live in or around Newtown. These people have a passion for helping others and creating a culture of charity, hope, and faith in their community. They believe in paying it forward and passing these values down to the next generation. Many high school students who have volunteered have ended up going on to careers in physical therapy, sports medicine, and services for the handicapped.

Unfortunately, this charitable organization that benefits so many with so much positive energy from the community and over 25 years of experience now finds itself at odds with its hometown for its very survival.LOF has been offering to engage in a constructive process with the town to identify options for a permanent home along Newtown's extensive shoreline that does not unreasonably impose on its neighbors. However, the town leaders have decided to instead seek an injunction in court against LOF, its volunteers, and its beneficiaries from engaging in any activity in Newtown. The question should not be how can we shut it down, but rather how can we make it work. Newtown is better than this and as a town we need to tell our leaders that we want a solution, not a lawsuit.

David Wiener
9 Marlin Road, Sandy Hook         April 16, 2018

Editor's note: See related story in this week's print edition of The Newtown Bee.

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This Week's Poll

Newtown Cultural Arts Commission is presenting or coordinating on six weeks of special events. Which event are you looking forward to the most? (Visit our Features page for a full story with details about all of these events.)

“In The Bag” exhibition, on view to September 28
0% (0 votes)
The Lords of 52nd Street concert, September 14
0% (0 votes)
Newtown Arts Festival weekend, September 15-16
50% (1 vote)
“An Evening of the Arts,” September 15
50% (1 vote)
“The Fox on the Fairway” production by Town Players of Newtown, weekends September 21-October 13
0% (0 votes)
“The Main Street Replica Project,” launching September 25
0% (0 votes)
Someday Cinema Series screenings of “The Blues Brothers,” September 30
0% (0 votes)
Photography display “In Our Rearview Mirror” by Marleen Cafarelli, et al, October 1-30
0% (0 votes)
“Love, Laughter, and Rhubarb” with Tinky Weisblat, October 3
0% (0 votes)
Newtown Day, October 6
0% (0 votes)
The 3rd Annual Newtown-Sandy Hook Restaurant Week, October 8-14
0% (0 votes)
Basket weaving workshop with Tina Puckett, October 13
0% (0 votes)
“Courageous Conversations in A Complex World,” October 17
0% (0 votes)
Live at ETH: David Wax Museum concert, October 19
0% (0 votes)
The 2nd Annual Fall Carnival at Fairfield Hills, October 19-21
0% (0 votes)
Connecticut Author’s Reading Series, October 21
0% (0 votes)
Natalie’s Open Mic, October 21
0% (0 votes)
“The Wordsmiths,” October 24
0% (0 votes)
Pianist Konstanza Chernov, October 28
0% (0 votes)
Someday Cinema Series double feature screenings of “Bride of Frankenstein” and “The Beast with Five Fingers,” October 29
0% (0 votes)
Total votes: 2