Way We Were


Way We Were, Week Ending December 7

Published: December 07, 2018 at 06:00 pm

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December 10, 1993

For the past two years, The Bee Publishing Company has been organizing its books on fine and decorative arts, architecture, and design. That collection, about 2,450 volumes, is now at 30 Main Street in Newtown, in a historic brick building constructed in 1855 as the town’s first probate court. Coincidentally, it also served as a library when it first opened. Most of the books in this collection were acquired over the past 30–35 years, and all have been catalogued. Starting in the early spring, the library will be available for reference work. To make an appointment, call The Newtown Bee. The antiques reference library is continually seeking donations and has attained a non-profit status to benefit donors. Those interested in contributing antiques-related books, including town histories should contact the Newtown Bee at 426-3141.

***

The Newtown Fund issued a late appeal this week for more support for its annual Holiday Basket Program. Eleven more families in need have been identified, and the current list of holiday basket benefactors is not long enough to fill the additional need. Groups or individuals willing to “adopt” a family by providing a complete holiday meal and gifts for a family should call as soon as possible. Financial contributions are also always welcome.

***

Anticipated budget shortfalls for the 1993-94 school budget include $15,000 that was pledged to the school system for keeping open the high school pool. In a memo to the Board of Education, Superintendent John Reed said it appears that approximately $15,000 will be raised but this was only half the goal by groups wanting to keep the pool open. It appears the school board will consider making up this difference by using money not spent in other areas of its budget. Dr Reed said the Fairfield Area Swim Team has experienced a 45 percent decline in its membership, which has lowered the revenue it hoped to generate.

***

Graduates of the Berkshire Woods Treatment Center at Fairfield Hills drove home the point December 1 that “treatment works” in ceremonies held at Kent House there. Setting the tone for the event, Berkshire Woods clients directed by Gerri Campbell-Mitchell, provided a rendition of the song, “Hero.” Past graduates and current clients of the substance abuse treatment program had gathered to exchange stories, share experiences, and to reinforce the idea that it takes hard work to overcome chemical dependency. “You are proof that treatment works,” Ardell Wilson told the graduates. She is the bureau chief for addiction and community health for the state Department of Public Health and Addiction Services. (DPHAS)

***

State police are seeking a Garner Correctional Institution prisoner who spent the Thanksgiving holiday on a furlough from the high-security prison but failed to return on November 26. State police are searching for inmate Leroy Kelly, 33, formerly of West Haven, who was serving a 22-year sentence on charges of attempted murder, interfering with police, and illegal possession of a pistol. The attempted murder charge stems from a 1976 incident in Bridgeport. State officials said that Mr Kelly hadn’t returned to Garner about four hours after he was due back from furlough. State police have asked the Connecticut Fugitive Task Force to help them find Mr Kelly. While serving time, Mr Kelly had successfully returned from 40 different furloughs from prison. From a law enforcement perspective, police must assume that Mr Kelly could be dangerous.

December 13, 1968

The Board of Selectman wishes to remind townspeople, beginning December 13, no vehicle may be left on any town highway from sunset to sunrise. The overnight parking ban is to facilitate snow plowing during the winter months. Any vehicle left unattended may be removed by the town at the owner’s expense. In addition, a fine of up to $25 may be levied. The parking ban will remain in effect through March 15.

***

Newtown Police Sergeant Kenneth Shaw, felled by a heart attack some weeks ago, reports from Danbury Hospital that he is feeling much better. He appreciates the cards and remembrances sent to him at the hospital and regrets that the doctor still will not allow him to have visitors.

***

Newtown police received a call Sunday, December 8, that a car was afire on Hanover Road near Silver City. The late model car, which belonged to Michael Waytok, of 45 Otis Street, Stratford, had been stolen from the Miamogue Yacht Club, Bridgeport, sometime late Saturday or early Sunday morning. Investigating officer Harry Noroian indicated Tuesday morning that the investigation was continuing. The car was a total loss.

***

Let it be known that … The strong wind last week came knocking at the Al Boyson door, and left the top half swinging. For those who are not in the know as yet, the new building going up on Church Hill Road on the up side of the underpass is a soft ice cream palace. Ed Sullivan is now driving to Boston for work as his job was relocated and his house unsold. A family of swans has been living down by the river in the location of the old iron bridge. The Singing Sergeant Ken Shaw is feeling so good these days that it won’t be long before he is pinching the nurses for speeding in the hospital hallways. His tuneful self will be missed this Saturday night at the annual Lions Christmas party as the members roar in the holiday season at the Hawley Manor.

***

A recent wine tasting party at the home of Mr and Mrs Charles O’Connor of Brushy Hill Road was sponsored by the Liquor Cabinet, 43 South Main Street. Ernest Rippe, state manager of Barton & Guestier, introduced French and German imported wines, and explained that red wines should be served at room temperature, according to tradition. Simply put, red wines should stand, cork pulled and replaced, approximately one half hour or more before serving to allow the wine to breathe. White, rose, and sparkling wines should be served chilled. Mr Rippe also explained that most good wine will contain sediment. Stand any bottle upright before serving, allowing the sediment to settle.

December 17, 1943

Continuing a custom of recent years, Christmas music will be broadcast each evening next week from 5 to 6 o’clock from the belfry of the Congregational Church. Amplifiers will carry the program a considerable distance up and down the street, creating that Christmas spirit of joy and cheer so important this season. On Sunday evening, December 19, the Carol Vesper service in the church will be carried outside. The amplifying system is being installed and operated again this year through the kindness of Charles Robinson of Sandy Hook.

***

The Men’s Literary and Social Club met at Hawley Manor on Wednesday evening with the principal Carl LeGrow as host and John J. Northrop as essayist. The evening’s speaker was John Angel of Zoar district, who gave an illustrated talk on his work as a sculptor.

***

Van Hayes, one of Sandy Hook’s well-known citizens, celebrated his 83rd birthday on Sunday. Despite his 83 years, Mr Hayes looks much younger and feels much younger than that! For nineteen years Mr Hayes was associated with the Yost typewriter company in Bridgeport. In 1918 he left this company and entered the employ of the Fabric Fire Hose company, Sandy Hook, where he remained until retirement in 1932

***

A small but enthusiastic group of golfers, numbering seventeen, held the annual stag dinner for members of the Newtown Country Club at the Avalon on Saturday evening. Following an appetizing menu, the inimitable “Tom” Neary served as toastmaster, handing out prizes accompanied by apt remarks on the abilities and disabilities of those present. One member was given a small bank in which to keep his winnings and another a fishing license from the state of Connecticut, permitting him to fish his balls from the various brooks on the course. The Bee considers it undiplomatic, however, to mention the prize-winners’ names. Suffice it to say a good time was had by all.

***

Harry Tomlinson, a former resident of the South Center district, will leave by plane on Christmas Eve from LaGuardia Field, New York, for Madison, Wis., where he will be a guest of several days of a boyhood friend. Mr Tomlinson, since leaving town, has conducted a lunch business at the corner of Noble and Boston Avenues in Bridgeport.

December 13, 1918

The Danbury Hardware store is a veritable Santa Claus store with its Toyland. Toys of every conceivable kind can be found at this store, and it will pay readers of The Bee to drop in and see them. The Danbury Hardware Co. say: “Buy at a live store, where you can get what you want at a price you can afford, where quality, service, and price have got to be right.”. This is the right kind of talk and they are all right.

***

George Robson was the first to have a sleigh rode this season. He had his trotter out in Sandy Hook, Wednesday afternoon, taking advantage of the snow and sleet, which made fair slipping.

***

The store of R.H. Beers is taking on the Christmas look with its suggestions of Christmas gift giving in the way of handkerchiefs for ladies and men, games galore, Kibbe’s choice confections in gift boxes, sleds, and skates.

***

Thomas Reilly has bought of W. W. Latham the place he sold to Mr Latham on October 7. Mr Reilly thinks a great deal of Newtown, and it made him homesick to think he had sold his old home, so he bought it back.

***

Miss Anna May Betts has received word from Cyril L. Tucker, who enlisted in the Motor Department of the army last April, that he has been promoted to sergeant.

 

Please consider sharing your old photographs of people and places from Newtown or Sandy Hook with The Newtown Bee readers. Images can be e-mailed to kendra@thebee.com, or brought to the office at 5 Church Hill Road to be scanned. When submitting photographs, please identify as many people as possible, the location, and the approximate date.

 

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