Features


The Way We Were, for the week ending June 15, 2018

Published: June 14, 2018 at 12:00 am

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Marked only as Health District Board, no other writing appears on the back of this Bee file photo. The image is too small to determine a date on The Bee calendar hanging in the background.
Marked only as Health District Board, no other writing appears on the back of this Bee file photo. The image is too small to determine a date on The Bee calendar hanging in the background.

June 18, 1993


The state legislature has approved State Representative Julia Wasserman's proposal for the establishment of a task force to study issues relating to the future use of state property on its Fairfield Hills campus. Rep Wasserman said she expected Governor Lowell Weicker, Jr, would sign the legislation. By January 1, 1994, the task force will report its findings and recommendations to the commissioner of the Department of Mental Health and the General Assembly, and the state's Office of Policy and Management. The task force will consist of the OPM designee, the DMH designee, Rep Wasserman, Senator Ted Lovegrove, and other appointees. "I fought very hard for it," Rep Wassermsan said." I think it is important that the town, the townspeople, and all town agencies have input into the process."

***


The Legislative Council has rejected First Selectman Zita McMahon's proposal that an ordinance be written to prescribe when the flag at the intersection of Main Street and Church Hill Road should be lowered to half-staff for local people. The consensus among council members was that such decisions should be made by the Board of Selectmen. Mrs McMahon told council members that the issue is "dear to the hearts" of many people. If the council went through the process of developing an ordinance, that would give people opportunities to make their opinions known, she said. In light of the council's decision, Mrs McMahon said she soon would ask the Board of Selectmen to write regulations on this matter.

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With the beginning of summer freedom and youthful diversions, nights can be very long for parents waiting for the return of kids who have gone out with friends. Even parents who are certain of their own values and standards sometimes wonder whether they are being too strict, or not strict enough with their children. Teenagers quickly pick up on the uncertainty and use it as a lever to loosen restrictions: "Everyone else's parents let them … [fill in the blank]." The truth is, however, that everyone else's parents are not of one mind about child rearing, and they have as many doubts and questions as you. This week, The Bee reports what professional counselors say about setting limits for teens and encouraging them to accept new responsibilities and new rights.

***


An inmate with a long history of convictions for felonies walked away from the Western Connecticut Substance Abuse Treatment Unit on Monday, the third escape from the minimum-security prison at Fairfield Hills. Warden David May said the recent spate of walkaways is a result of plans to transfer the unit's male inmates to other facilities so that WCSATU can become a facility for females. "Most of the guys are handling the change in a mature fashion but a few aren't," Warden May said. Inmates gradually have been transferred to other facilities since the announcement was made last month.

***


A roadside area along Route 34 by Exit 11 where farmers and other vendors used to peddle their wares has been closed by the State Department of Transportation. A sign proclaiming "State property, no trespassing" blocks off the roadside where fruits, vegetables, flowers, and other items have been sold during warmer months. "They said it was unsightly and a traffic hazard," said DOT district manager Russell Kozey regarding complaints by Newtown officials about the vending taking place there. He could not remember the name of the first person who called, but a second call from Zoning Enforcement Officer William Nicholson prompted the state to put up the signs. R. Kim Mitchell of Mitchell Farm said he is looking for another site for the farm stand.

June 21, 1968


About 300 teenagers turned up at the town park last Saturday, June 15, for a dance at the pavilion. From this successful "first" for 1968 has come a plan for a series of dances run by teenagers for teenagers. These will start this Friday, June 21,and run through August 30. The dances will be at the K of C Hall on Route 6 from 8-11:30 pm and will have live bands providing music. The Burnt will open the series on June 21.

***


FIREWORKS: Wednesday evening, July 3, Newtown's Progress Festival will open with a display of fireworks in Dickinson Memorial Park. Last year, 5,000 people came to view the spectacle. Admission to the park will again be restricted to cars with a current park sticker. These can be purchased daily at the park by Newtown residents. Chief Lee Glover of Newtown Hook and Ladder will again be in charge of safety.

***


ANTIQUES SPECIAL: If you think The Bee is putting on weight this week, you're right. It contains, for the usual mini price, a maxi special section of 48 tabloid pages devoted entirely to antiques. You'll find maps, county by county, showing the location of over 190 antique dealers, book reviews, show listings, articles, and Connecticut houses open to the public.

***


Graduation exercises that were scheduled for 6 pm on the lawn at Newtown High School on Wednesday evening, June 19, were hastily removed to Edmond Town Hall Theater because of a heavy rainstorm. There were 162 graduates who received diplomas from David R. Chipman, Board of Education vice chairman. Twenty-six graduates were members of the National Honor Society. It was a damp and disheveled class of 1968 that reassembled at the town hall after reluctantly quitting the wet high school lawn. The band, which had played a spirited impromptu selection, including "Wait Til The Sun Shines Nellie," at the high school did not accompany grads and chorus to the town hall, realizing that there would not be room.

***


Norman D. Westlake, driver education instructor at Newtown High School, has sent the following letter to Anthony Amaral of Amaral Motors: "On behalf of the students who have completed our driver education course, I would like to thank you once again for making the driver's education car available to us this year. Our students and parents appreciate the opportunity of having this course made available at the high school and without the an interested person such as you this would not be possible."

June 25, 1943


A frozen food locker plant is about to be opened in Bethel, thanks to the efforts of Harward Williams of Newtown and Joe E. Brown of Bethel. These men succeeded in persuading R. Hoyt Sloane, representative of American Frozen Food lockers of White Plains, N.Y., to come to Bethel on June 17, when he addressed an enthusiastic group at the Bethel high school. His company builds and services locker plants. Mr Sloane was convinced by the temper of the meeting that there would be no difficulty in getting more than the minimum 300 names required and he is making arrangements to lease an empty store in Bethel where the plant can be installed.

***


Lieut Birdseye Sniffen returned to Camp Ritchie, Maryland on Monday, after enjoying a five-day furlough with his family in Sandy Hook.

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Local flower growers who have been patiently waiting for the first blooms to appear in their flower gardens will be interested to know that Mrs William Seaman of Sandy Hook has been picking sweet peas from her garden for the past ten days.

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Miss Lorraine Shepard had the distinction of receiving the Good Citizenship Certificate for the Newtown High School, which is made each year to an outstanding member of the graduating class by the Daughters of the American Revolution.
***
A bolt of lightning struck the residence of JJ Lipton in Hopewell district during last Thursday's electrical storm and caused a smoldering fire which did considerable damage. The Newtown and Dodgingtown fire departments responded and soon had the fire under control.

June 21, 1918


TRAIN RIDERS ARRESTED: Upon complaint of the railroad company that they were again being annoyed by riders, Deputy Sheriff Beers and Constables Carlson and Johnson arrested several at Hawleyville, last Sunday. William Collins, who hailed from Washington, Ct., and is well-known around Hawleyville, was one of the first captured. Collins is a man who fails to stay long in a place and was making use of the break beams to get back to Washington after an outing in Danbury. When arraigned before Justice McCarthy Monday, he pleaded guilty and was let go upon payment of costs. The others were young boys from Danbury and their cases were continued.

***


Mr and Mrs Horace Smith received a surprise housewarming by a company of their friends from Taunton, Flat Swamp, and the Borough Monday night. They received a number of valuable presents. Refreshments and sandwiches and cake were served, and a pleasant social time enjoyed.

***


The Newtown detour, necessitated by road work in the Sandy Hook Glen, is one of the worst that automobile drivers have had to contend with in years. When the bridge in Sandy Hook village is crossed going east, automobile traffic is directed "over the hill," past the Curtis peach orchards. The driver hasn't proceeded very far before he realizes that he is up against a real old-time detour, a narrow road with deep and wet gutters where a single mistake is liable to tie things up for a while... Natives have found a way to dodge a greater part of it, but strange to say they have not informed the public of a better way, which is as follows: immediately after crossing the bridge turn sharp to the right and follow the river south about a mile and a half over a fine surface. After passing a large white mill building on the right and fine residences on the left, take left-hand dirt road. This road narrows as it approaches the mountain detour, but it is seldom used and there is little chance of meeting another car. The mountain road is intersected very near its eastern terminus and the worst of the detour is avoided.

***


Through the generosity of the Sandy Hook Band a lawn party and benefit for the Red Cross will be held on the evening of July 4 at the Town Hall. A band concert will be given at the Town Hall and ice cream will be dispensed. This will be followed by dancing in the hall, the music furnished by an orchestra from the band. At the same time a roll of honor of the soldiers engaged in war will be unveiled.

***


Monday night whists are becoming increasingly popular and those members who have not been in the habit of attending should make a point to be there. They are sure to be repaid for the effort. H.C. Hubbell was the host this past Monday night.

Please consider sharing your old photographs of people and places from Newtown or Sandy Hook with The Newtown Bee readers. Images can be e-mailed to kendra@thebee.com, or brought to the office at 5 Church Hill Road to be scanned. When submitting photographs, please identify as many people as possible, the location, and the approximate date.

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This Week's Poll

Newtown Cultural Arts Commission is presenting or coordinating on six weeks of special events. Which event are you looking forward to the most? (Visit our Features page for a full story with details about all of these events.)

“In The Bag” exhibition, on view to September 28
0% (0 votes)
The Lords of 52nd Street concert, September 14
0% (0 votes)
Newtown Arts Festival weekend, September 15-16
50% (1 vote)
“An Evening of the Arts,” September 15
50% (1 vote)
“The Fox on the Fairway” production by Town Players of Newtown, weekends September 21-October 13
0% (0 votes)
“The Main Street Replica Project,” launching September 25
0% (0 votes)
Someday Cinema Series screenings of “The Blues Brothers,” September 30
0% (0 votes)
Photography display “In Our Rearview Mirror” by Marleen Cafarelli, et al, October 1-30
0% (0 votes)
“Love, Laughter, and Rhubarb” with Tinky Weisblat, October 3
0% (0 votes)
Newtown Day, October 6
0% (0 votes)
The 3rd Annual Newtown-Sandy Hook Restaurant Week, October 8-14
0% (0 votes)
Basket weaving workshop with Tina Puckett, October 13
0% (0 votes)
“Courageous Conversations in A Complex World,” October 17
0% (0 votes)
Live at ETH: David Wax Museum concert, October 19
0% (0 votes)
The 2nd Annual Fall Carnival at Fairfield Hills, October 19-21
0% (0 votes)
Connecticut Author’s Reading Series, October 21
0% (0 votes)
Natalie’s Open Mic, October 21
0% (0 votes)
“The Wordsmiths,” October 24
0% (0 votes)
Pianist Konstanza Chernov, October 28
0% (0 votes)
Someday Cinema Series double feature screenings of “Bride of Frankenstein” and “The Beast with Five Fingers,” October 29
0% (0 votes)
Total votes: 2