Features


Way We Were, for the week ending September 14, 2018

Published: September 13, 2018 at 03:00 pm

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September 17, 1993

Newton Strikes Again! Newtown Hook & Ladder is the latest group in town to fall victim to the misspelling of its name. Chief Steve Murphy said one “Newton” coat was among the five which the volunteer fire company ordered recently for its new recruits. “One of our recruits was walking around a fire, wearing the coat, and took a lot of ribbing,” Chief Murphy said. At about the same time, the company had ordered about 500 new patches for its uniforms. “The patches were billed to Newton Hook & Ladder so I quickly called to make sure they weren’t done incorrectly too, which they weren’t,” he said. But it’s an old story, he complained. “I’ve lived here all my life and I’m tired of telling people it’s Newtown, with two W’s and one word,” he said.

***

Going back on a promise made last year not to expand the inmate population on the Fairfield Hills campus, Department of Corrections Commissioner Larry Meachum said Wednesday that the number of beds for female inmates at the Western Substance Abuse Treatment Unit in Fairfield House will increase by 32. A year ago in an interview with The Bee, the commissioner addressed local fears abut an expanded DOC presence at Fairfield Hills. At the time he had ruled out any expansions, saying, “People think we’re lying when we’re not.” In that August ‘92 interview, Mr Meachum went on to say, “Over a year ago we needed a site for drug and alcohol rehabilitation for female inmates.” He stated that DOC had put a facility at its institution in Niantic. Now the Niantic facility is overcrowded, and DOC has no choice but to send inmates to Fairfield Hills.

***

Newtown Stop & Shop will be having a tag-bake-craft sale on Friday and Saturday, September 24 and 25 at the Sand Hill Plaza store. On Saturday there will be pony rides, clowns, balloons and many more fun things going on. All money raised by the employee-run fair will go to the Newtown Salvation Army Food Pantry and Faith Food Pantry. Stop & Shop has raised over $10,000 in the past two years.

***

To the Editor: This is for the person who vandalized the lovely little rest spot next to the Sandy Hook Post Office. You should be ashamed of yourself! Do you know what time and effort it takes to care for this lovely little spot? Especially since it is done voluntarily by someone who takes the time to give us pleasure. Hope you get the message! Margaret Stampp, Heritage Village, Southbury.

***

If you have an old clunker, the state may pay you to get rid of it. State environmental officials are studying a plan to offer cash for old cars to get them off the road as part of the effort to reduce air pollution before tighter air quality regulations go into effect in 15 months. “What we’re doing is trying to find the dirtiest of the dirty,” said Richard Soj of the DEP’s air quality unit, which is conducting the study for the Early Vehicle Retirement Program. Officials are poring over recent emissions testing results to determine the likely candidates for the program. Target vehicles were made before 1981, when emissions control standards were more lenient than they are now.

September 20, 1968

In cooperation with national dog week, The Bee is calling all dogs to take part in a special project devoted entirely to our four-footed friends. If your dog is old enough to be named the town’s senior citizen, handsome enough to be crowned king or pretty enough to fill a queen’s throne, or just willing to pose for a picture for The Bee, then take action. The Bee refuses to let national dog week, September 22 through 28, slip by without a pat for the pooch population. Bring your pet to The Bee offices on Church Hill Road any time on Monday or Tuesday, September 23 or 24, to have a picture taken. All photos will appear in the paper the following week.

***

Donald Sturges of Sandy Hook finished basic training at Great Lakes Naval Training on September 6. He will be home on leave until September 25, at which time he will report to Norfolk, Va. His address there is FA Donald Robert Sturges B15-63-00, USS Columbus CG12, New York.

***

Among the teen-age winners of a nationwide creative arts contest sponsored by Youth Magazine, published by the United Church of Christ, is Tom Cook of 64 Main Street. Tom’s entry was in the photography category. Each winner receives a prize of $25 and his entry will be published in the magazine.

***

Among local exhibitors at the Eastern States Fair this week was James W. Lightfoot of Woodbury who won the Grand Champion Southdown Ram in the sheep show. The Champion Ewe was also a Lightfoot-bred entry shown by a Rhode Island farm. John B. Pearsal of Bethlehem also exhibited sheep, winning several prizes.

***

In recent days some unprincipled individual sawed from its post and made off with the school bell which stood beside the Land End School in Hawleyville for so many years. Also gone is the light fixture from the front of the school. Newtown Historical Society members are outraged at this theft of their property. Anyone with information leading to recovery is asked to contact Kenneth Kimble, president. The thief, learning that he has taken property belonging to the Historical Society, might well deposit it (some dark night) at the school.

September 24, 1943

Impressive and largely attended funeral services were held Saturday morning for first Lieutenant Andre Maye, who was killed Tuesday night of last week near Templeton, Mass., when his plane crashed while on a routine flight from Bradley Field, Windsor Locks, to Manchester, N.H. Lieutenant Maye was a first lieutenant and flight leader of Stamford Flight A, Fairfield County Squadron, Civil Air Patrol, and for some time had been stationed at Bradley Field, where he was highly regarded, both personally and for his flying ability. The services at St Rose Church filled the edifice with friends and relatives as well as many men in uniform, all of whom mourned the untimely death of this popular young man.

***

Because of reduced staff, the Cyrenius H. Booth Library has not been able to extend its service to the Sandy Hook Free Library on Thursdays during September. It is expected, however, to resume the Thursday afternoon schedule on September 30, when from 2:30 to 4 o’clock, it will be possible for adults and children to take out and return books at the Sandy Hook Library. The children’s hour will be held from 3 to 4 o’clock under the direction of Miss Smith. Books may also be taken out or returned on Saturdays from 3 to 5 and 7 to 8 pm.

***

The Huntingtown General Store will be closed in observance of the Jewish New Year at 6 o’clock on Wednesday, September 29, all day Thursday and Friday, and will reopen on Saturday, October 2. The store will close again on Friday, October 8 at 5 pm, and remain closed all day Saturday, October 9.

***

I wish to extend to my many friends my grateful appreciation and sincere thanks in assisting in harvesting my corn crops during my illness. —John C. Beers.

***

A visit to the Greencorg Kennel of Mrs H.L. Green in Palestine district, and just a glimpse of the seven puppies would convince even the most skeptical of the unusual qualities of the Welsh Corgi Pembroke type dog, which is rapidly coming to be a favorite breed. They weigh 20 – 24 pounds, with a head like a fox, pricked ears, and stand 12 inches at the shoulder. They have a short tail, with a medium length coat of red hair.The Corgi needs very little grooming. Mrs Green informed The Bee Scribe that she raised a pup from three months, the dog now four years old, and to her knowledge, the dog has had only two baths in that time.

September 13, 1918

A trial, which proved to be of more than ordinary interest, took place at the Brick Building, Tuesday evening, when Herman Block, a son of Jacob Block of Middle Gate district, was arraigned before justice P.H. McCarthy on charges of failing to pay his personal taxes. A preliminary hearing took place on August 17, when Block claimed he had paid his taxes in Bridgeport. As the State was not prepared at the time to disprove this claim, a continuance was granted until August 31 and later at the request of attorney J. Robert Beecher, who had been employed by Block, until September 17. When Block was put on the stand he testified under oath that he was married in 1913 and lived continuously in Bridgeport until 1917, except for visits to his father. The State’s first witness was C.D. Stillson, who makes the enrollment every year of those liable to pay personal taxes in Newtown. He testified that Block lived in Newtown in 1914 and 1916. C.F. Conger was the next witness who testified that he ran a jitney between Newtown and Bridgeport and carried Block several months but did not remember the exact time. The last and most important witness was Town Clerk Oscar Pitzschler, produced town records showing that Block was made a voter in October, 1914. This was like a thunder clap to attorney Beecher, who thought his client had been telling him the truth. He realized that Block was getting himself into a very bad predicament because when he was made a voter it was necessary that he should swear that he was a town resident for six months. Attorney Beecher made no plea for Block and Justice McCarthy immediately ordered Block to pay taxes and costs of about $34. As soon as court was adjourned Isador Block made a very disparaging remark about Justice McCarthy, the latter immediately ordered his arrest, which was done by Borough Officer Gannon and George Hayes, who soon had him in the lock up. The Block family have been a menace to local authorities for 20 years. Several members have been arrested at one time or other and their conduct in court is always contemptible. It is a well known fact that Herman block spent several months of 1914 in the Bridgeport jail, serving time on a manslaughter charge, yet he testified that he was living with his wife in Bridgeport from 1913 – 1917.

***

Joseph Cardue, while at the corn roast last Friday, broke a leg. Dr F.J. Gale attended him and he was taken to the Danbury Hospital by Ray Carroll.

***

On returning from a corn roast last Saturday night at Wintergreen, a young lady and gentleman, two of the town’s popular young people, became quite excited at finding themselves alone in the vicinity known as Devil’s Den. After failing to find a path to bring them onto a road, they were about to call for a guide when Birdsey Parsons came to the rescue and escorted them to the road. After thanking him they were on their way. Whether they separated from their company accidentally or intentionally is left for you to decide. Think of being the fair young lady on a moonlit night, and then give your opinion as to what you would do yourself.

***

Mr and Mrs H.W. Oppe and family are to move to Cod Cob, Conn,. On the 26th. Mr Oppe is secretary at the Hiram Lodge, No. 18 and the departure of the family will be regretted.

***

James Campbell has overhauled his rye mill and put it in good order for the fall work.

 

Please consider sharing your old photographs of people and places from Newtown or Sandy Hook with The Newtown Bee readers. Images can be e-mailed to kendra@thebee.com or brought to the office at 5 Church Hill Road to be scanned. When submitting photographs, please identify as many people as possible, the location, and the approximate date.

 

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