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From ‘Roughnecks’ To Champions: 50 Years Of Football At Newtown High School

As the beginning of another football season gets set to kick off and Newtown High School players strap on the pads and lace up the cleats with postseason success again on their minds, it’s also a time to reflect on the start of the program — and its rich history, including significant changes throughout the decades. This fall campaign, which gets underway with a September 11 visit to South-West Conference foe Pomperaug of Southbury, beginning at 6 pm, marks the 50th year of varsity football at Newtown High. Just about the only thing that’s remained the same in the past half century’s worth of seasons is the standard 11-player-per-side configuration and the use of a pigskin to score touchdowns. Equipment has changed; the team name is different (going from Indians to Nighthawks); the home field — Blue & Gold Stadium — is in a different location (the original spot was Taylor Field, behind Hawley School on Church Hill Road).

9/11 Tribute Ride Rolls Through Newtown

Sirens and flashing emergency vehicle lights were the first hint that more than 2,000 motorcycles were about to raise a long rumble past bystanders Sunday, August 30, for the 15th Annual CT United Ride. The ride, which started after 9/11, is both a tribute and fundraiser for family emergency relief funds for state police and firefighters and two local United Way agencies. Newtown Hook & Ladder Co. #1 and Sandy Hook Volunteer Fire & Rescue Company had used their ladder trucks to suspend a large American flag over South Main Street, near Amaral Motors. Firefighters were also stationed outside the firehouses in Botsford and Dodgingtown, both of which were again passed during the 60-mile ride through ten towns.

In A Pickle Over How To Exercise? Try Pickleball

Athletes ranging in age from preteens to 60-somethings were on the courts at Treadwell Park getting a fun-filled taste of an unfamiliar yet intriguing game, on September 1: They were learning and playing a scaled down variation of tennis known as pickleball. “I like it. It’s exactly what I expected it to be,” said John Duval, who paired with another adult, Brie Blodgett, and played an abbreviated contest against Jennifer Arnold and their much younger pickleball newcomer, 12-year-old Jackson Harrington. “It’s a blown-up version of ping pong, or a scaled-down version of tennis, or badminton — or a combination of all three,” added Duval.

Public Comment Sought; Community Center Planning Has Been ‘Cautious’

After several months of meetings, the Community Center Commission is “still being very cautious and not voicing too much of an opinion” about specific ideas for the facility’s use, said Commission Co-Chair Andy Clure. The group is awaiting feedback from the public, for which there are several upcoming opportunities, including a survey, and open forums, he said.

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