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  • Challenges Of Classic Main Street Restoration Chronicled On Owner’s Website

    Walking past a twisting vine carved into smoked glass on the front door, Diane Thompson enters her bright, naturally lit Victorian home that has been a fixture on Newtown’s Main Street since 1899. After launching major renovations several months ago, her eventual goal is to resell the restored home that first caught her eye with its charm.

  • Young Rider Makes Transition From Ponies To Horses Look Easy

    Growing up around horses and receiving riding and jumping training from a teacher who couldn’t possibly care any more about her success than any other (the instructor happens to be her mom), Newtown’s Ellie Ferrigno has quickly become an advanced rider for her age.

    Now 12, Ferrigno is competing against horse lovers who are two, three, four, five — sometimes as many as six — years older than her.

    And she’s still winning.

  • Snapshot: Sister Colleen Therese Smith

    Occupation: I’m the principal of St Rose of Lima School, and religious sister, Apostle of the Sacred Heart of Jesus.

    Family: I am the youngest of five children. I grew up in St Louis, Mo. I have three older brothers and one older sister. My mother died when I was 27; my father and my stepmother still live in the St Louis area. I currently live with my community, Apostles of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, in Shelton. There are five of us living at St Joseph Convent.

  • The Top of the Mountain

    This curious kitty has heard back from another reader of our “Way We Were” column, regarding the photo of two boys near the edge of a body of water, which ran in the August 8 issue of The Newtown Bee. Jacquie Dachenhausen had contacted me last month, saying she felt fairly certain the boys were her son and his best friend. Gail and Chuck Luf, though, also believe that they know the boys. “I think it’s my son, Josh, and James Barrett, a Fresh Air guest we had many years,” says Gail.

  • The Way We Were

    September 8, 1989

    From now on, students in the school system will receive antidrug lessons in every grade from kindergarten through grade 12. The antidrug education effort is part of the school system’s health curriculum. Assistant School Superintendent Kenneth Freeston said the state is mandating that schools teach about alcohol, nicotine, drugs, AIDS, youth suicide prevention, and child abuse.

     

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  • Bill Evans Soulgrass Mashing Jazz, Jams At Fairfield's StageOne

    FAIRFIELD — At age 21, up-and-coming sax man Bill Evans got the opportunity to stand and play in the shadow of arguably one of the most influential jazz musicians of all time, Miles Davis. Davis so appreciated Evans’ talents that he featured the young musician on four of his albums recorded in the early to mid-1980s.

  • ‘Write On, Newtown!’ Is ‘Right On’ For Labor Day Parade

    Grand Marshal Sydney Eddison prepares to throw a flower toward bystanders during Monday’s parade.  

  • I Scream, You Scream: What’s In That Ice Cream?

    Growing up in Minnesota in the 1960s, one of our favorite commercials shouted out, “I scream, you scream! We all scream for… ice milk!” Of course, ice milk was the only alternative to ice cream, and this commercial touted ice milk as the healthy alternative.

  • Residents Fare Well In Bridgewater

    BRIDGEWATER — A few Newtown residents earned trophies, ribbons and other honors during the 63rd Bridgewater Country Fair, which was presented at Bridgewater Fairgrounds Friday through Sunday, August 15-17.

    Sandy Hook Volunteer Fire & Rescue Company received the trophy for Best Overall Fire Company following the fair’s opening event on August 15, Bridgewater Fair Firemen’s Parade.

    In addition, other residents received honors for their efforts during the annual three-day event.

  • The 2015 ‘Old Farmer’s Almanac’ Offers Another Year Of Facts And Fun

    The Old Farmer’s 2015 Almanac is on the stands.

    It is the quintessential advice magazine, dispensing information between its covers on subjects as diverse as animal husbandry to romance. Founded in 1792 by Robert B. Thomas, the Old Farmer’s Almanac has been the go-to tome for these past 200-plus years, not only for farmers young and old, but for the confounded consumer, as well.