Home
  • Longtime Police Officer Promoted To Sergeant

    It has been a long time coming, but a veteran police officer has been elevated from patrolman to supervisor, with the promotion of Scott Ruszczyk to the rank of sergeant.

    Sgt Ruszczyk, 46, was sworn into his new rank in May 1 ceremonies at Town Hall South attended by family, friends, and police staffers.

    A 22-year veteran of the police department, Sgt Ruszczyk was hired by the town in June 1993, when former police chief Michael DeJoseph headed the police department.

  • Environmental Review Of River Walk Project Continues

    Inland Wetlands Commission (IWC) members are continuing their review of the environmental aspects of The River Walk At Sandy Hook Village, a 74-unit housing complex proposed for the west side of Washington Avenue in Sandy Hook Center, near the Pootatuck River.

    IWC members held the second installment of a public hearing on the application on May 13. The applicant is seeking a wetlands/watercourses protection permit from the IWC.

  • Town’s 12/14 Insurance Claims Pay $1.1 Million

    Town Finance Director Robert Tait released information to local officials recently detailing insurance claims paid by Newtown’s provider of municipal risk financing and risk management services. The town finance office also released its latest report on the Sandy Hook Special Revenue Fund.

  • Police Commission Reviews Stats From Accident-Prone Areas

    Police Commission members, in their role as the local traffic authority, are reviewing a statistical report listing the places in town with the highest accident rates during a three-year period, with an eye toward making some traffic improvements to reduce those collision rates.

  • Aggressive New 'Grandparent Scam' Reported In State

    HARTFORD — In a newly reported scam targeting older adults, callers demand money immediately to free a kidnapped relative and threaten physical harm to the relative if funds are not delivered, according to Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen and Department of Consumer Protection Commissioner Jonathan A. Harris.

  • Genealogy 101

    C.H. Booth Library will host a series of Genealogy 101 programs on the first four Wednesdays in June. Each program will run 2 to 4 pm, and different subjects will be covered each week.

    June 3 will be “Getting Started,” covering the basic guidelines in genealogical research.

    The series will continue with “Vital, Bible, Church and Cemetery Records” on June 10, with an emphasis placed on Connecticut and Massachusetts sources;

  • State Police Ordered To Release Documents In School Shooting Probe

    HARTFORD (AP) — The state Freedom of Information Commission has ruled that Connecticut State Police must release personal documents seized from the Sandy Hook School shooter’s home during the investigation of 12/14.

    The agency ruled Wednesday, May 13, in favor of The Hartford Courant. Efforts by The Courant to obtain the documents since January 2014 had been blocked by the state Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection.

  • Girls Night Out At Ben’s Bells Studio, May 21

  • Flags To Be Lowered For Peace Officers Memorial Day

    HARTFORD — Governor Dannel P. Malloy on May 14 announced that he is directing US.and state flags in Connecticut to be flown at half-staff from sunrise to sunset on Friday, May 15, 2015, in recognition of Peace Officers Memorial Day.

    The national observance pays tribute to local, state, and federal law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty. It is recognized annually during National Police Week, which this year runs May 10-16.

  • DOT Describes Exit 11 Interchange Improvements Plan

    About 30 residents attended a May 7 informational session sponsored by the state Department of Transportation (DOT) for discussion on DOT’s plans to make a variety of improvements to the Exit 11 interchange of Interstate 84 and surrounding roadways. The changes are intended to alleviate traffic backups in the often-congested area and reduce motor vehicle accidents.

    Residents posed a variety of questions to DOT planners on what effects the changes would have on the area.