Way We Were


Way We Were, for the week ending May 10, 2019

Published: May 09, 2019 at 05:00 pm

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May 20, 1994

The appearance of toxic chemical waste alongside New Lebbon Road on May 13 has prompted area residents to seek stronger efforts to stop illegal dumping in their neighborhood. Christine Dzujna, of 23 New Lebbon Road, said illegal dumping on her road continues to be a problem, and it’s getting worse. Mrs Dzujna said that waste from landscapers, construction sites, and offices have been dumped in the area. New Lebbon Road is a dirt road that connects High Rock Road to High Bridge Road. Mrs Dzujna suggested that police make themselves more visible at all times of the day and night along New Lebbon Road. Public Works Director Fred Hurley said several steel drums found along New Lebbon Road on May 13 contained toxic chemical solvents. The black drums were repackaged in sealed drums to prevent leakage, he said. The town called American Environmental Technologies Inc., of Bethel to handle the toxic waste.

***

The After-Prom party for Newtown High School students is set to begin at midnight, May 20, and continue to 5 am at the Newtown Health and Racquet Club. The party is for all Newtown High School juniors and seniors, regardless of whether or not they attend the prom. The Parent Connection, a networking organization for parents, is urging parents, teachers, and the community to support and urge the children to participate in the After-Prom. There is no charge to attend and the evening will include food, music, and a raffle. Students must be in attendance to win. The After-Prom is being co-chaired by Marie Fodor and Rosemary McCulloch, both of Parent Connection, who say the event will maintain a sober-in and sober-out environment.

***

Planning is underway for Family Pizza Night to benefit the Family Life Center of Newtown Inc. This extravaganza will be held on Tuesday, June 7, in the Newtown Middle School cafeteria. Pizza restaurants from Newtown, Bethel, Brookfield, and Danbury are donating their pizzas. It is a great opportunity to compare pizza from Basil’s, My Place, Fireside, Capri’s, John’s Best, Pasta Garden, Pizza Villa, George’s, Little Caesar’s, Pizza palace, and Domino’s. A $5 ticket will allow you to sample “all you can eat.”

***

The Lillinonah Audubon Society will conduct a members’ meeting on Thursday, May 26, at Southbury Town Hall. The meeting will begin at 7:30 pm with refreshments to follow at 8 pm with a business meeting and the program. The public is invited. “Pesticides” will be the title of a talk given by Candace Bartholomew from the University of Connecticut Cooperative Extension Service. For eight years she has been teaching pesticide safety to farmers, commercial applicators, and consumers, and providing pesticide information to various groups and agencies.

***

Police report the theft of a sign from Mayer Real Estate at 22 Main Street sometime between 6 pm on May 14 and 8 am on May 15. Someone went onto the property and stole a three-foot by two-foot sign that displayed the words, “Mayer Real Estate” in black letters on a white background. The crime is a sixth-degree larceny.

 

May 16, 1969

Delay is the sad word for the construction both at the Newtown High School in Sandy Hook and for the additions and alterations at the present high school on Queen Street which will become the Middle School for grades five through 8. The last timetable presented by contractor John Zandonella indicated the new Sandy Hook building would be ready for partial occupation by the mid-year break of the next school year, February 1970. Now construction has lagged five to six weeks behind schedule. John Cennamo, clerk of the works, made his monthly report to the Public Building Committee on Monday evening, May 12. Work at the senior high school is falling five to ten percent behind each month, he said, citing as the main reason the extreme difficulty of getting labor. He was backed up on this tight labor situation by Architect John Fodor. There is need of 46 masons, Mr Fodor said, but only 17 have been available and two of these are apprentices and one a supervisor. Every effort has been made to get more help. Mr Lester Burroughs, Public Building Committee member, confirmed the situation throughout the state.

***

There are 50 ex-drug addicts now being cared for in the rehabilitation center known as the “Renaissance” in Wilton. They are from 12 to 42 years of age, the average being between 17 and 25. A member of this group and also a staff member will give first-hand information on the drug problem at a meeting Thursday, May 22, sponsored by the Concerned Citizens of Narcotics. Come at 8 pm to the cafeteria at Newtown High School.

***

Recent favorable action by Newtown Board of Finance and by townspeople in approving the $10,000 grant to Danbury Hospital in the Selectman’s budget for 1969-70 brought the following wire to The Bee from Bertram A. Strook, who is traveling in South Africa. “News travels fast. In far away South Africa learned of generous hospital grant. Congratulations to all concerned. Happy for our community.” Bert.

***

The Newtown Association for Retarded Children, NARC, will meet Thursday, May 22 at 8:15 p.m. in the Newtown High School library. The slate of officers and board of directors for next year will be voted upon. The final plans for the June dinner will be discussed by Mrs Alexander Muliero, dinner chairman.

***

The Newtown Cadettes will be capped by Senior Girl Scout Troop 229 at a capping ceremony on Wednesday, May 21 at 7:30 p.m. at Trinity Church. Parents and cadettes of troops 150 and 599 have been invited to witness the ceremony. Marilyn McCarthy, Senior Troop Chairman, has announced that the following cadettes will be capped: Ruth Callahan, Deborah Degenhardt, Susan Lucas, Jennifer Johnson, Sandy Martin, Darcy Mcenaney, Karen Lee Roberts, Cindy Rudman, Marion Wadleigh and Carol Wehmeyer.

 

May 19, 1944

The Hawley School baseball team showed considerable improvement in its game played last Friday afternoon against Bethel at Taylor Field. The final score was 13-6 in favor of Bethel. Pitching for Newtown was done by F. Krawiecki, Charles Swan, and Ted Emery, with Emery and Swan working behind the plate. On Tuesday afternoon Newtown played at Washington, losing by a score of 9-2. Emery and Swan took turns pitching and receiving. The game this Friday afternoon is against New Milford on their field.

***

NEWTOWN HAS DONE IT AGAIN — GONE OVER THE TOP: The chairman’s report of the local VFW drive, 1944 Welfare Fund shows that the quota of $1,500 assigned to post No. 308 has been reached, and when all the money pledged has been collected, the quota will be exceeded. On behalf of the Charles H. Peck Sr. and Jr. Post No. 308, and the Ladies’ Auxiliary Commander Charles Nelson extends the grateful appreciation of all members to the people of Newtown for their generous contributions, making the mission a success.

***

Station WICC of Bridgeport has generously given a half hour time each week to the Red Cross. On Wednesday, May 17 at 7:15 p.m., The Newtown Red Cross Canteen was second in this series. Canteen President Mrs Frederick R. Sorenson, and the two captains, Mrs H.L. Clow and Mrs George Stuart, with Judge Paul V. Cavanaugh, Red Cross Chairman, as interlocutor, discussed the trials and rewards of Canteen service. Certainly, dishwashing was far more in the minds of these ladies than was broadcasting when they volunteered for Canteen work, and we hope they enjoyed the new experience.

***

A special town meeting has been called by the Board of Selectmen for Saturday, May 20, at the Edmond Town Hall at 8 p.m. to act on the recommendation from the Board of Finance that an appropriation not to exceed $3,500 be authorized to settle a claim made by Dr Walter A. Nolander for damage to his trees and shrubs, caused by a fire which started from the Flat Swamp school last December 21.

***

A moving picture, “Your Son Is My Brother,” was shown on Wednesday afternoon in the guild room of St. John’s church. The picture, sponsored by Hiram Lodge No. 18, A.F. & A.M., portrays the benevolent services now being rendered by Masonry to the men and women in the armed forces of our country. It was produced for the Masonic Service Association through fraternal courtesy of the Hollywood Moving Picture Association.

 

May 16, 1919

The first piano brought into Newtown was owned by Miss Betsey Glover, afterward the wife of Harry Beers. The date of its purchase is not obtainable. This piano long ago ceased to exist as a musical instrument, but the woodwork is still preserved and is put to practical use. Since 1860, when there were very few pianos here, that instrument has changed in construction. The upright has come into use and is destined to take the place of the square piano. In 1864, the first cabinet or parlor organ was brought into town by Mrs Julius Sanford, now of New Haven. Since that time, the melodeon has been comparatively worthless. There are now about 74 pianos and organs in town.

***

Walter Glover sailed from Philadelphia, Pa., April 16 on the Eastern Sun for the Mediterranean. It was a United States supply ship, loaded with provisions for the East. Walter is a wireless operator, the son of selectman and Mrs W.B. Glover.

***

Newtown’s unique and splendid records in the Liberty and Victory Loans should fill the hearts of every citizen with patriotic pride. The local last Liberty and Victory Loan committees and canvassers all deserve our most heart appreciation and thanks.

***

The Misses Scudder entertained as week-end guest, Mrs George Treat, Miss Francis Treat and Miss Jeanette Waugh of New Haven, where Miss M. Elizabeth Scudder is during the week.

 

Please consider sharing your old photographs of people and places from Newtown or Sandy Hook with The Newtown Bee readers. Images can be e-mailed to kendra@thebee.com, or brought to the office at 5 Church Hill Road to be scanned. When submitting photographs, please identify as many people as possible, the location, and the approximate date.

 

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